FW: Hello

I reluctantly decided to forward this to the blog because it is a testament
to the difficulties involved with bringing a new approach to ACS to the
people who need it. Times have been so trying that even my most stalwart
volunteers are being tugged away to attend to life’s realities. I barely
dodged the bullet on losing two of my greatest human assets.

Also, I wanted to reiterate that not all SLPx are computer-illiterate. Some,
like an acquaintance of mine, Brad, are quite competent. Still, the time
pressure on them works in a similar manner; SLPs are pulled in so many
different directions that there’s great temptation to stick with a narrow
suite of solutions that seem to provide about 80% of what disabled people
need. However, I submit that 80% solutions will never lead to acceptable
employment rates among the Disabled wanting work. If disability is imagined
as a multi-dimensional spectrum with mental functionality being one of its
axes, it must therefore follow that those 80% answers will never help those
who fall toward the higher end of the mental axis.

That simply isn’t right.

—–Original Message—–
From: Scott Royall [mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2005 3:52 PM
To: ‘Tao Ju’
Subject: RE: Hellon

I am pleasantly surprised by your response. Frankly, I half-way thought you
would bow out completely because of your time constraints. It’s good to see
my guess was wrong.

I had not thought of your flyer idea. It might just work too. Of course, the
text will need to be edited and "punched up" to make its points on one page.
If you or Ming want to do a little cut-and-paste job and see what you can
come up with, great. We’ll meet Sunday at our customary time, 3:00.

Who to target with the flyer is a good question. Some of them need to go to
go those same pathologists and thnologists who have been so resistant to
this change. However, a second option may be to go to the Special Education
departments at the schools. One of our new-found friends, Dianne Williams,
might be willing to share her contacts. As I say, we just need to make some
initial sales to demonstrate the product’s viability.

I also think I might not be the best person in our little trio to initially
contact Lori Sterling at Methodist. Perhaps my mother should do it.
Naturally, I’ll have to still do the demo since I am our one example of the
type of disability best able to benefit from Xpress It. Recent experience
has made me a little too cynical for First Contact though.

Oh, and don’t bother bringing the ancient hardware Sunday.

—–Original Message—–
From: Tao Ju [mailto:jutao@cs.rice.edu]
Sent: Wednesday, July 06, 2005 8:23 AM
To: Scott Royall
Subject: RE: Hello

Hi, Scott

I read the two essays you wrote. I think they are well written and truly
convincing. I especilly agree with you on your criticism on the SLP’s
enthusiasm towards phrase/sentence prediction. I remembered that when we
were interviewed by TechTV guys, one of their first questions is if it has
prediction function. Indeed, people are acustomed to link the disability
of speech to the desire for simple language. In fact, they often forgot
the fact that disabled people are often smarter than they are. Therefore,
flexibility is a major selling point of XpressIt.

Sounds like a good flyer to send off. The question is, who should we reach
out for. Although Ming and I are a little hactic these days with my
parents who just arrived from China, let us know how we can help.

Tao & Ming

On Tue, 5 Jul 2005, Scott Royall wrote:

> What did you think of my ideas?
>
> —–Original Message—–
> From: Tao Ju [mailto:jutao@cs.rice.edu]
> Sent: Tuesday, July 05, 2005 1:57 PM
> To: Scott Royall
> Subject: Re: Hello
>
> Hi, Scott
>
> Yes, I am still here. Just let me know.
>
> Tao
>
> On Tue, 5 Jul 2005, Scott Royall wrote:
>
> > Hello, are you still there? We need to talk.
> >
> >
>

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