FW: Trying to Answer the Question

Steve,

 

Although I’m not at all
sure this will interest you, I’m forwarding it for whatever value it offers.
I wrote the following blog entry as a sort of tangential response to Darrell
Shandrow’s email to you regarding website accessibility for the visually
impaired. A lot of the blog entry is rather “meta,” with little
technical value. However, the underlying point is valid, you are either part of
the solution or the problem. If you are a disabled person and need better website
access, the best answer is to help web designers understand what you truly
need. You don’t have to have a computer science degree and work
experience, though I happen to.

 

 I think people don’t
always recognize the rate at which the Internet—and everything else
related to computers—is evolving. We are just beginning to understand how
to interface circuitry and neurons. The concept of 2-D web sites may be dead in
15 years as images flow directly into our brains. Meanwhile, my fellow Disabled
need to help the webbed world appreciate their needs.

 

If you’re curious about me
or Xpress-It, check out www.conchbbs.com.
Sorry but you’ll have to enable scripting to view it properly. This is
one area where I side with Leo; scripting is a security risk, but the Internet
without it would be a pile of stone tablets.
J

 

Scott

 

From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Monday, July 30, 2007 8:04 PM
Subject: Trying to Answer the Question

 

One of the common comments I get from parents of disabled
children Is that they are torn between trying to prepare their children to
function in the real world, and trying to just protect them from it.
That’s very understandable, but it ends up being fruitless. Yes, maybe
you can provide for their financial future, although that would be difficult in
itself.

 

The real problem with trying to protect disabled kids is
that you would have to somehow shield them from realizing that society is
likely to never treat them fairly. In other words, the true pain of disabled
people in society is in recognizing how it treats them. If the child is at all
self-aware, he’s destined to notice sooner or later that it doesn’t
treat him fairly. You would have to practically hermetically seal him in a box
just so he doesn’t know what a society is. Alas, we are social creatures.
We have to basically socialize to function as humans. Thus, as the child grows
up, he will have to come to terms with society in some sense. That’s
certainly not easy for a disabled person to ever do, but what’s the
alternative?

 

I’m not a big fan of religion so I don’t really
buy the idea of a Hereafter. I subscribe to William Shatner’s philosophy
instead (oh, don’t go there, just don’t! J). To paraphrase: this life is all we can really count on so
we might as well make the most of it. Something may happen with our
souls/spirits/whatevers, but we will no longer be who we are now. Notice the
ramifications of this. A disabled person may feel his or her life sucks, but
that’s all s/he gets so s/he might as well participate in life as much as
possible. A point may be reached where going on won’t be worthwhile for
me for instance, but my only option until then is to keep trying. The same
thing applies for any other disabled person whether he knows it or not. Yes,
maybe life sucks. It isn’t going to get any better, though, until you
try.

 

And, to insert an obligatory plug here, Xpress-It certainly
makes trying a bit easier if you are speech impaired.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                       

 

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Trying to Answer the Question

One of the common comments I get from parents of disabled
children Is that they are torn between trying to prepare their children to function
in the real world, and trying to just protect them from it. That’s very
understandable, but it ends up being fruitless. Yes, maybe you can provide for
their financial future, although that would be difficult in itself.

 

The real problem with trying to protect disabled kids is
that you would have to somehow shield them from realizing that society is
likely to never treat them fairly. In other words, the true pain of disabled people
in society is in recognizing how it treats them. If the child is at all
self-aware, he’s destined to notice sooner or later that it doesn’t
treat him fairly. You would have to practically hermetically seal him in a box just
so he doesn’t know what a society is. Alas, we are social creatures. We have
to basically socialize to function as humans. Thus, as the child grows up, he
will have to come to terms with society in some sense. That’s certainly not
easy for a disabled person to ever do, but what’s the alternative?

 

I’m not a big fan of religion so I don’t really
buy the idea of a Hereafter. I subscribe to William Shatner’s philosophy
instead (oh, don’t go there, just don’t! J). To paraphrase: this life is all we can really count on so
we might as well make the most of it. Something may happen with our
souls/spirits/whatevers, but we will no longer be who we are now. Notice the
ramifications of this. A disabled person may feel his or her life sucks, but that’s
all s/he gets so s/he might as well participate in life as much as possible. A point
may be reached where going on won’t be worthwhile for me for instance,
but my only option until then is to keep trying. The same thing applies for any
other disabled person whether he knows it or not. Yes, maybe life sucks. It isn’t
going to get any better, though, until you try.

 

And, to insert an obligatory plug here, Xpress-It certainly
makes trying a bit easier if you are speech impaired.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                       

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RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

Re: DELL:   XPS 1710 technical support

Yes, I figured as much. To clarify, I don’t have a M1330 yet.
I am checking with you beforehand. Ya know, pre-planning.
J Dell
says that the connector is not compatible so you will have to at least add
another cord to your inventory. Of course, doing that without a M1330 to work with
is tough, huh? Well, let’s see what we can do about that.

 

My contacts with Dell are still a bit tenuous. I’m a blogger,
and I still can’t get a M1330 evaluation unit. M1330s are still scarce,
and selling as fast as they are made. Yet, we seem to have a rare win-win-win situation
here if we can take advantage of it. The M1330 is destined to be quite popular
because of its performance and diminutive size, and Lind is the only company I trust
to make power accessories for it. As a last resort, I could have mine shipped to
you when/if I order it (I’m still comparing models), but that makes me a
little uncomfortable because of the experimenting you’d need to do. M1330
users are going to want automotive converters like the DE2060 so we might as
well get ahead of the curve, no?

 

My Dell contact is on vacation until Wednesday. We’ll see
what he says.

 

From: Terry Neville
[mailto:lrlind@lindelectronics.com]
Sent: Monday, July 30, 2007 11:49 AM
To: Scott Royall
Subject: Re: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Scott,

Although the connector is somewhat different, we believe that you should be
able plug it into that laptop model and we believe there is a good chance the
adapter adapter will work. Although the connector is somewhat different, we
believe it will fit in. There is no other connection in the works for it from
us. Keep in mind, we have not seen this laptop nor tried it so you will need to
simply try it.

Thanks,  T. Neville

On 7/28/07 2:54 PM, "Scott Royall" <royall@conchbbs.com> wrote:

Lind,
 
I need some technical assistance. Is there any way for your DE2060 to properly
power Dell’s new M1330? Of course that’s not the power supply you
normally sell for that laptop, but I have a very unique need to be able to swap
between a M1330 and this M1710 effortlessly. The email below will give you some
background on what I use my laptops for, and why interchangeability among the
power infrastructure is so important. My wheelchair is the power source.
 
Scott
 

From: Scott Royall [mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2007 9:30 PM
To: ‘Richard_Bernier@Dell.com’; ‘lrlind@lindelectronics.com’
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

Richard (and Lind Electronics),
First, I had to tell you that it is sheer pleasure to deal with someone
who’s at least mildly technical. With Dell, customer service usually
reminds me of a deer caught in the headlights. Not very helpful. In addition to
being a software engineer for 25 years, I am an amateur radio operator so
I’m fairly comfortable with software and electronic hardware.
 
You’re right in saying it is difficult to definitively predict whether a
power supply (that’s the correct term, “power adapter” is
simply consumerese) designed for the  Gen2/M1710 can properly power
something like the M1420. The answer is a function of the supply’s
design. We’re talking about what are called “switching supplies,”
and they generate their output electricity in a manner quite similar to how a
Gatling gun works. Imagine a group of capacitors, which are components that
work like tiny batteries. You  charge up one and go to the next, and the
next, and so on. Meanwhile, the device you are powering is discharging those
capacitors in sequence. You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to
recognize what happens if you charge up all your capacitors faster than they
are being discharged. You get an automatic throttle effect just from how a
switching power supply works. Of course there are exceptions. Some of the
ubiquitous “wall warts” that surround us are so poorly designed and
made that they use 40% of their max load just keeping the capacitors topped off
even when powering nothing.
 
It’s also worth knowing a few basics about electricity. At the voltages
we’re talking about (the M1710 actually likes about 20V), electricity is
like string or wet spaghetti. You literally cannot push it into a device, the
device has to draw it. This is why the term “load” is used. This is
also why those 15-watt Compact Florescent bulbs have become all the rage. The
average house circuit can put up to 3000 watts to a light fixture before
opening the circuit breaker. Yet, those bulbs only draw 15 watts so
that’s the total load. Again, electricity isn’t like a liquid. You
can create it, but you can’t pump or push it. Electricity has to be
pulled. One final bit of evidence of this fact is the effect my M1710 has on my
wheelchair. Running at 100%, the M1710 can drain two Type 24 deep cycle
batteries in six hours. That number goes up to eight to ten hours under less
intense use. (And  now, you can better understand why the M1420 is under
consideration.)
 
So, unless the Lind engineers did something really weird in the design of their
DE2060-1429, it should be able to power something like the M1420 without hardly
doing more than idling. Am I right, Lind? The DE2060 is an amazingly smart
little brick that has served me without quibble for years. It has been dropped,
kicked, rolled over, dragged down the street, and so on. Anything that well
engineered isn’t likely to waste power.
 
Your comment about the M1330 is very helpful and on point. Yes, the different
power connector is a real factor that counts against the laptop. Yet, this may
become another question for the people at Lind. They don’t seem to
currently have a 12-VDC supply for the M1330, but only they know what they are
working on. Maybe the DE2060 could do it through a different cable. We don’t
know yet.
 
I was inaccurate in saying that I’m replacing the M1710.  After all,
it still has two years of warranty left. No, I’m going to do what I used
to do when I was with Shell. The 1710 will become my “Ready Five”
machine. Top Gun freaks will recognize the phrase. In the Navy,
it’s simply a second flight that’s always up on deck with engines
running ready to launch in five minutes if the first flight needs it.
That’s the future role for this laptop, to sit in a corner, keeping
itself synchronized with critical data on the new primary, ready to replace it
on the wheelchair very quickly in case of failure. Now you can see why
maintaining compatibility in the infrastructure required by the laptops is
important. The Lind brick is about the only thing on this chair that is
reliable enough to not need a backup.  And, when a laptop has to be
swapped, you really, really don’t want to have to swap infrastructure
boxes too. You want to be able to yank out a few connections—don’t
whine, we’re discussing emergency procedures, be able to pull off the
dead or dying machine (they’re simply velcro’d in place), and plunk
down the backup. It’s reasonable to call this the digital
 equivalent of “Eject! Eject! Eject!”, because it saves a lot
of people a lot of grief when I go down.
 
So, until we hear better, let’s just assume that the 1330 is still in the
running. Can you think of any other Dells that should be considered? Why
don’t you send me a comparison of the 1420  and 1330. In addition to
the usual stuff, I need to know weird things like number and location of ports,
etc.
 
Scott
                                                                                                                                                                    

From:
Richard_Bernier@Dell.com [mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]

Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2007 2:31 PM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

Mr. Royal,
 
I thank you replying back to me so soon.  Also, thanks for removing my
phone number from your blog.
 
Okay, I have created a dispatch for the motherboard to be replaced.  If
everything goes right with logistics, we should have someone out to your home
to replace the motherboard.  The dispatch number for your order is
091966215.
 
Wow, you got a customer-built power supply that runs off your wheel chair!
 I haven’t heard about anything like that before, but it sounds like
a really great idea that a lot of people could use.  
 
I must admit it is really hard to say if this custom power supply will properly
power the 1430 or the 1330.  Follow with me for just a moment to
understand why I hesitate on providing you defiant answer.  The following
is little background about system types and power needs.
 
As you probably already know the Inspiron 9400/E1705 and the M1710 are very
much the same, but the M1710 is much more powerful. The XPS 1710 come with a
130 Watt D-series power supply.  The 9400/E1705 works on a 90 Watt
D-series power supply.  The reason for the M1710 needing more power is the
video card options.  The reason why I bring this up is that I know for
sure that the E1705 can use a 130 Watt power adapter if you where using a XPS
high end video card in it.
 
Okay, so where am I going with this you ask.  Let’s talk about the
Inspiron 1420.  It is shipped with either a 65 or 90 Watt power supply,
which uses a standard D-series adapter.  It depends on the video option on
which wattage to select.  The thing about this unit is that it has good
video options but they are onboard.  This system will not use power unlike
the M1710 or the 9400/E1705 which use separate video card options.  So,
could you use a 130 Watt power supply, probably?  But, I personal would
not do it.
 
Finally, let’s talk about the XPS M1330.  A beautiful system which
is already getting great reviews.  However, I do not think this one is
going to work for you, because that the power supply is completely unique for
the system.  Fist it is not a D-series power supply.  It kind of
looks like power supply to an Inspiron 2200, but the tip is Octagon shaped, not
smooth and round.  The second important item is this system only has the
65 Watt power supply option.  A little side note to this, the
M1330’s power supply will not work in other Dells; however other 65 watt
D-series adapters will work in this system.
 
Yes, I know I probably gave you more information than you needed or wanted.
 But, this seemed like an important subject to you so I wanted to make
sure you had enough information to help.
 
My opinion:
 
I went to talk with a co-worker that knows a lot about this subject.
 Basically, when using a 130 Watt power supplies that the amount of power
used regardless the rating of the system.  So, you could attach the 130 W
to the M1330 (at your own risk says my co-worker), however the system is going
to be warmer than using a 65 W, as the extra energy will dissipate around the
system in the form of heat.  Personal I always try to match my power
supply with my systems rating.  I would rather place a lower power adapter
then a higher one.  It uses less energy, and your system stays nice and
cool.
 
I really hope that what I wrote you helps.
 
Best regards,

Richard Bernier
Online Community Outreach Liaison
Dell Inc.
800-822-8965 Ext. 726-8859 | Richard_Bernier@dell.com <mailto:richard_bernier@dell.com>


Dell always strives to improve!  Please send feedback to my
manager Joanne_Hamann@dell.com
<mailto:Joanne_hamann@dell.com>


This e-mail message may contain information that is confidential
and/or privileged. If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the
sender by reply e-mail and delete the message and any attachment(s). Thank you.


From: Scott Royall [mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2007 7:36 PM
To: Bernier, Richard
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

Regarding the number, done. Sorry.

The service tag for this puppy is FWDGKB1. My address is:
 
15906 Manfeld
Houston, TX 77082
 
It seems a crime to exchange a very stable mainboard for a lousy USB port, but
the point is valid.
 
Something you  can really help with is selecting the next laptop. I need
something just as powerful as the M1710, but more compact  and
energy-efficient (that means the Core 2 Duo). Right now, the front runners seem
to be the 1420 and 1330, but there are questions that the Dell website
won’t answer. First, will the 1710’s power adapter run either of
these laptops? That question is a bit tricky to get answered correctly. A
salesperson will say no, simply because smaller laptops come with smaller
adapters to save cost and weight. However, as of last year, at least the 1420
could run quite happy on a Gen2/1710 adaptor. Will the 1330? Of course I
don’t really use the AC adapters. Instead, I have a very rugged
automotive adapter custom-built by Lind Electronics for the Gen2/1710. It runs
off my wheelchair, and makes the laptop think it’s always on AC.

From:
Richard_Bernier@Dell.com [mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]

Sent: Monday, July 16, 2007 9:31 AM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

Mr. Royall,
 
Thank you for your response.  So, from what I gather from your email, you
currently do not have an issue that needs to be address. However, you said that
there is a bad USB port.  I can setup a motherboard replacement that will
correct that.
 
Please reply back to me with your computers service tag, your current address,
and phone number.  When I can verify all your updated information I will
setup an order to get your computer repaired.
 
Also, one other item, I would request that you please xxx-xxx-xxxx out my phone
number, on your blog.  That number comes directly to my cube and there is
no way I could answer like a call center does.  Thanks in advance.
 
I will be looking for your reply.
 
Best regards,

Richard Bernier
Online Community Outreach Liaison
Dell Inc.
800-822-8965 Ext. 726-8859 | Richard_Bernier@dell.com <mailto:richard_bernier@dell.com>


Dell always strives to improve!  Please send feedback to my
manager Joanne_Hamann@dell.com
<mailto:Joanne_hamann@dell.com>


This e-mail message may contain information that is confidential
and/or privileged. If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the
sender by reply e-mail and delete the message and any attachment(s). Thank you.


From: Scott Royall [mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2007 3:26 PM
To: Bernier, Richard
Cc: Hamann, Joanne
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

Ok Richard, I’m a little disappointed that Dell took this
long to respond, but not really surprised. The email address, marie@dell.com,
was a bit too cute to  not be a public front. I was with a large company
long enough to know how often people get transferred. That’s why
I’m sending a copy to Joanne, to hopefully gain some degree of continuity
across multiple agents.
 
I am somewhat a high-visibility Dell user. It is difficult to sum myself up in
a tidy little package that an agent will  relate to. I am physically
disabled, and am at least partially active in society. That means that hardware
going around with me is a bit hi-vis in itself. You can get a photo of me at my
website. The easiest place to see me is at http://www.conchbbs.com/blog <http://www.conchbbs.com/blog> .
 I recommend looking at it despite the fact that it’s a few laptop
generations back, because it shows just how visible the laptop I use is. By
extension, the photo gives you some clues just how dependent I am on my
laptops. They speak for me, they bank for me, they communicate for me, they even
game for me. If anything, that tells you I am probably more dependent on my
laptops than most Dell customers. It also means that the standard Dell
technical support experience, with calls going to Panama or Mumbai or wherever,
does not work for me. That’s why the online outreach program became
necessary in my case.
 
Now, after that lengthy intro, I have to tell you that I don’t currently
have a technical issue for you—yet. I appeared to have one last week, but
the source turned out to not be the 1710. The 1710 has lost one USB port on the
back, but there’s enough redundancy in a 1710 to cover losing one USB
port.
 
HOWEVER, my 1710 is supposed to be replaced as my primary laptop later this
summer. That says I’m going to have some highly-technical questions needing
good answers as I select the new laptop. Answers that won’t be on the
Dell website. That’s when you and Joanne will really be in a position to
help by  finding the answers
 

From:
Richard_Bernier@Dell.com [mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]

Sent: Friday, July 13, 2007 12:15 PM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support
Importance: High

Mr.
Royal,
 
My name is Richard; I am part of Dell’s Online Community Outreach group
here in Round Rock, Texas.  You contacted us about your XPS 1710 needing
support.  Since I work a lot on these units, I will be the one to assist
you.
 
I am going to provided you my direct contact phone, 1-800-822-8965 ex.
726-8859.  Please call as soon as it is convenient for.  I look
forward to working with you.
 
Regards,
Richard Bernier
Online Community Outreach Liaison

Dell Inc.

800-822-8965 Ext. 726-8859 | Richard_Bernier@dell.com <mailto:richard_bernier@dell.com>

Dell always strives to improve!  Please send feedback to my
manager Joanne_Hamann@dell.com
<mailto:Joanne_hamann@dell.com>
 

This e-mail message may contain information that is confidential
and/or privileged. If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the
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RE: Armored Fist 3

Mike,

 

This is the same patch I have already
applied. I can connect as a client (player), but not a game host. Do you
understand now?

 

Scott

 

From: Technical Support
Email [mailto:support@novalogic.com]
Sent: Monday, July 30, 2007 1:13 PM
To: Scott Royall
Subject: RE: Armored Fist 3

 

 

When the game was originally written we encoded the Multiplayer IP
address into the game.

 

Now that we gave moved to a new building and a new IP address the
game needs to be patched in order to recognize the change.

 

The patch can be downloaded at this link.

 

http://novalogic.com/download/nlexepatcher.html

 

 

 

Mike
Harling

Director
of Customer Support

Novalogic
Inc.

support@novalogic.com

tel:
818 878-0325

To insure a timely response, please quote all previous
correspondence.


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Sunday, July 29, 2007 5:58 PM
To: Technical Support Email
Subject: Armored Fist 3

 

I’m  curious. Do you ever intend to allow public
servers again? I know, Armored Fist 3 is a very old game, and you do very
little to support it these days. Still, people have been unable to connect
their public servers to the Novalogic access server since your data center
moved months ago. We duly applied the patch required by the move and have no
problem connecting to you as clients. But, our game servers never show up on
your game list. The one game you host is of use to only people who can do the
extraordinary keyboard and joystick gymnastics of manual targeting. I cannot.

 

Armored Fist 3 is a strange beast in that it is that
it’s the only game I know of that lets you socialize with people across
the world as you exchange pot shots in your virtual M1A2 tanks. There are much
better first-person shooters, but they are too frenetic for anything like
socializing unless you can talk while you type. AF3 is a niche product that a
few of us old codgers enjoy.

 

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Armored Fist 3

I’m  curious. Do you ever intend to allow public servers
again? I know, Armored Fist 3 is a very old game, and you do very little to
support it these days. Still, people have been unable to connect their public
servers to the Novalogic access server since your data center moved months ago.
We duly applied the patch required by the move and have no problem connecting
to you as clients. But, our game servers never show up on your game list. The one
game you host is of use to only people who can do the extraordinary keyboard
and joystick gymnastics of manual targeting. I cannot.

 

Armored Fist 3 is a strange beast in that it is that it’s
the only game I know of that lets you socialize with people across the world as
you exchange pot shots in your virtual M1A2 tanks. There are much better first-person
shooters, but they are too frenetic for anything like socializing unless you
can talk while you type. AF3 is a niche product that a few of us old codgers
enjoy.

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FW: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

Lind,

 

I need some technical assistance. Is there any way for your
DE2060 to properly power Dell’s new M1330? Of course that’s not the
power supply you normally sell for that laptop, but I have a very unique need to
be able to swap between a M1330 and this M1710 effortlessly. The email below
will give you some background on what I use my laptops for, and why
interchangeability among the power infrastructure is so important. My wheelchair
is the power source.

 

Scott

 

From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2007 9:30 PM
To: ‘Richard_Bernier@Dell.com’; ‘lrlind@lindelectronics.com’
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Richard (and Lind
Electronics),

First, I had to tell you that it is sheer pleasure to deal with
someone who’s at least mildly technical. With Dell, customer service
usually reminds me of a deer caught in the headlights. Not very helpful. In
addition to being a software engineer for 25 years, I am an amateur radio
operator so I’m fairly comfortable with software and electronic hardware.

 

You’re right in saying it is difficult to definitively
predict whether a power supply (that’s the correct term, “power
adapter” is simply consumerese) designed for the  Gen2/M1710 can
properly power something like the M1420. The answer is a function of the
supply’s design. We’re talking about what are called
“switching supplies,” and they generate their output electricity in
a manner quite similar to how a Gatling gun works. Imagine a group of capacitors,
which are components that work like tiny batteries. You  charge up one and
go to the next, and the next, and so on. Meanwhile, the device you are powering
is discharging those capacitors in sequence. You don’t have to be a
rocket scientist to recognize what happens if you charge up all your capacitors
faster than they are being discharged. You get an automatic throttle effect
just from how a switching power supply works. Of course there are exceptions.
Some of the ubiquitous “wall warts” that surround us are so poorly
designed and made that they use 40% of their max load just keeping the
capacitors topped off even when powering nothing.

 

It’s also worth knowing a few basics about electricity. At
the voltages we’re talking about (the M1710 actually likes about 20V),
electricity is like string or wet spaghetti. You literally cannot push it into
a device, the device has to draw it. This is why the term “load” is
used. This is also why those 15-watt Compact Florescent bulbs have become all
the rage. The average house circuit can put up to 3000 watts to a light fixture
before opening the circuit breaker. Yet, those bulbs only draw 15 watts so
that’s the total load. Again, electricity isn’t like a liquid. You
can create it, but you can’t pump or push it. Electricity has to be pulled.
One final bit of evidence of this fact is the effect my M1710 has on my
wheelchair. Running at 100%, the M1710 can drain two Type 24 deep cycle
batteries in six hours. That number goes up to eight to ten hours under less
intense use. (And  now, you can better understand why the M1420 is under
consideration.)

 

So, unless the Lind engineers did something really weird in the
design of their DE2060-1429, it should be able to power something like the
M1420 without hardly doing more than idling. Am I right, Lind? The DE2060 is an
amazingly smart little brick that has served me without quibble for years. It
has been dropped, kicked, rolled over, dragged down the street, and so on.
Anything that well engineered isn’t likely to waste power.

 

Your comment about the M1330 is very helpful and on point. Yes,
the different power connector is a real factor that counts against the laptop.
Yet, this may become another question for the people at Lind. They don’t
seem to currently have a 12-VDC supply for the M1330, but only they know what
they are working on. Maybe the DE2060 could do it through a different cable. We
don’t know yet.

 

I was inaccurate in saying that I’m replacing the
M1710.  After all, it still has two years of warranty left. No, I’m
going to do what I used to do when I was with Shell. The 1710 will become my
“Ready Five” machine. Top Gun freaks will recognize the
phrase. In the Navy, it’s simply a second flight that’s always up
on deck with engines running ready to launch in five minutes if the first
flight needs it. That’s the future role for this laptop, to sit in a
corner, keeping itself synchronized with critical data on the new primary,
ready to replace it on the wheelchair very quickly in case of failure. Now you
can see why maintaining compatibility in the infrastructure required by the
laptops is important. The Lind brick is about the only thing on this chair that
is reliable enough to not need a backup.  And, when a laptop has to be
swapped, you really, really don’t want to have to swap infrastructure boxes
too. You want to be able to yank out a few connections—don’t whine,
we’re discussing emergency procedures, be able to pull off the dead or
dying machine (they’re simply velcro’d in place), and plunk down
the backup. It’s reasonable to call this the digital  equivalent of
“Eject! Eject! Eject!”, because it saves a lot of people a lot of
grief when I go down.

 

So, until we hear better, let’s just assume that the 1330
is still in the running. Can you think of any other Dells that should be
considered? Why don’t you send me a comparison of the 1420  and
1330. In addition to the usual stuff, I need to know weird things like number
and location of ports, etc.

 

Scott

                                                                                                                                                                    

From:
Richard_Bernier@Dell.com [mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2007 2:31 PM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Mr. Royal,

 

I thank you replying back to me so soon.  Also, thanks for
removing my phone number from your blog.

 

Okay, I have created a dispatch for the motherboard to be
replaced.  If everything goes right with logistics, we should have someone
out to your home to replace the motherboard.  The dispatch number for your
order is 091966215.

 

Wow, you got a customer-built power supply that runs off your wheel
chair!  I haven’t heard about anything like that before, but it sounds
like a really great idea that a lot of people could use. 

 

I must admit it is really hard to say if this custom power supply
will properly power the 1430 or the 1330.  Follow with me for just a
moment to understand why I hesitate on providing you defiant answer.  The
following is little background about system types and power needs.

 

As you probably already know the Inspiron 9400/E1705 and the M1710
are very much the same, but the M1710 is much more powerful. The XPS 1710 come
with a 130 Watt D-series power supply.  The 9400/E1705 works on a 90 Watt
D-series power supply.  The reason for the M1710 needing more power is the
video card options.  The reason why I bring this up is that I know for
sure that the E1705 can use a 130 Watt power adapter if you where using a XPS
high end video card in it.

 

Okay, so where am I going with this you ask.  Let’s talk
about the Inspiron 1420.  It is shipped with either a 65 or 90 Watt power
supply, which uses a standard D-series adapter.  It depends on the video
option on which wattage to select.  The thing about this unit is that it
has good video options but they are onboard.  This system will not use
power unlike the M1710 or the 9400/E1705 which use separate video card
options.  So, could you use a 130 Watt power supply, probably?  But,
I personal would not do it.

 

Finally, let’s talk about the XPS M1330.  A beautiful
system which is already getting great reviews.  However, I do not think
this one is going to work for you, because that the power supply is completely
unique for the system.  Fist it is not a D-series power supply.  It
kind of looks like power supply to an Inspiron 2200, but the tip is Octagon
shaped, not smooth and round.  The second important item is this system
only has the 65 Watt power supply option.  A little side note to this, the
M1330’s power supply will not work in other Dells; however other 65 watt
D-series adapters will work in this system.

 

Yes, I know I probably gave you more information than you needed or
wanted.  But, this seemed like an important subject to you so I wanted to
make sure you had enough information to help.

 

My opinion:

 

I went to talk with a co-worker that knows a lot about this
subject.  Basically, when using a 130 Watt power supplies that the amount
of power used regardless the rating of the system.  So, you could attach
the 130 W to the M1330 (at your own risk says my co-worker), however the system
is going to be warmer than using a 65 W, as the extra energy will dissipate
around the system in the form of heat.  Personal I always try to match my
power supply with my systems rating.  I would rather place a lower power
adapter then a higher one.  It uses less energy, and your system stays
nice and cool.

 

I really hope that what I wrote you helps.

 

Best regards,

Richard Bernier
Online Community Outreach Liaison
Dell Inc.
800-822-8965 Ext. 726-8859 | Richard_Bernier@dell.com

Dell
always strives to improve!  Please send feedback to my manager
Joanne_Hamann@dell.com

This
e-mail message may contain information that is confidential and/or privileged.
If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender by reply
e-mail and delete the message and any attachment(s). Thank you.


From: Scott Royall [mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]

Sent: Monday, July 16, 2007 7:36 PM
To: Bernier, Richard
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Regarding the number, done. Sorry.


The service tag for this puppy is FWDGKB1. My address is:

 

15906 Manfeld

Houston, TX 77082

 

It seems a crime to exchange
a very stable mainboard for a lousy USB port, but the point is valid.

 

Something you  can
really help with is selecting the next laptop. I need something just as
powerful as the M1710, but more compact  and energy-efficient (that means
the Core 2 Duo). Right now, the front runners seem to be the 1420 and 1330, but
there are questions that the Dell website won’t answer. First, will the
1710’s power adapter run either of these laptops? That question is a bit
tricky to get answered correctly. A salesperson will say no, simply because
smaller laptops come with smaller adapters to save cost and weight. However, as
of last year, at least the 1420 could run quite happy on a Gen2/1710 adaptor.
Will the 1330? Of course I don’t really use the AC adapters. Instead, I
have a very rugged automotive adapter custom-built by Lind Electronics for the
Gen2/1710. It runs off my wheelchair, and makes the laptop think it’s
always on AC.

 

From:
Richard_Bernier@Dell.com [mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2007 9:31 AM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Mr. Royall,

 

Thank you for your response.  So, from what I gather from your
email, you currently do not have an issue that needs to be address. 
However, you said that there is a bad USB port.  I can setup a motherboard
replacement that will correct that.

 

Please reply back to me with your computers service tag, your
current address, and phone number.  When I can verify all your updated
information I will setup an order to get your computer repaired.

 

Also, one other item, I would request that you please xxx-xxx-xxxx
out my phone number, on your blog.  That number comes directly to my cube
and there is no way I could answer like a call center does.  Thanks in
advance.

 

I will be looking for your reply.

 

Best regards,

Richard Bernier
Online Community Outreach Liaison
Dell Inc.
800-822-8965 Ext. 726-8859 | Richard_Bernier@dell.com

Dell
always strives to improve!  Please send feedback to my manager
Joanne_Hamann@dell.com

This
e-mail message may contain information that is confidential and/or privileged. If
you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender by reply
e-mail and delete the message and any attachment(s). Thank you.


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2007 3:26 PM
To: Bernier, Richard
Cc: Hamann, Joanne
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Ok Richard, I’m a little disappointed that Dell took this
long to respond, but not really surprised. The email address, marie@dell.com, was a bit too cute to
 not be a public front. I was with a large company long enough to know how
often people get transferred. That’s why I’m sending a copy to
Joanne, to hopefully gain some degree of continuity across multiple agents.

 

I am somewhat a high-visibility Dell user. It is difficult to sum
myself up in a tidy little package that an agent will  relate to. I am
physically disabled, and am at least partially active in society. That means
that hardware going around with me is a bit hi-vis in itself. You can get a
photo of me at my website. The easiest place to see me is at www.conchbbs.com/blog.  I
recommend looking at it despite the fact that it’s a few laptop
generations back, because it shows just how visible the laptop I use is. By
extension, the photo gives you some clues just how dependent I am on my
laptops. They speak for me, they bank for me, they communicate for me, they
even game for me. If anything, that tells you I am probably more dependent on
my laptops than most Dell customers. It also means that the standard Dell
technical support experience, with calls going to Panama or Mumbai or wherever,
does not work for me. That’s why the online outreach program became
necessary in my case.

 

Now, after that lengthy intro, I have to tell you that I
don’t currently have a technical issue for you—yet. I appeared to
have one last week, but the source turned out to not be the 1710. The 1710 has
lost one USB port on the back, but there’s enough redundancy in a 1710 to
cover losing one USB port.

 

HOWEVER, my 1710 is supposed to be replaced as my primary laptop
later this summer. That says I’m going to have some highly-technical
questions needing good answers as I select the new laptop. Answers that
won’t be on the Dell website. That’s when you and Joanne will
really be in a position to help by  finding the answers

 

From:
Richard_Bernier@Dell.com [mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2007 12:15 PM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support
Importance: High

 

Mr.
Royal,

 

My
name is Richard; I am part of Dell’s Online Community Outreach group here
in Round Rock, Texas.  You contacted us about your XPS 1710 needing
support.  Since I work a lot on these units, I will be the one to assist
you.

 

I
am going to provided you my direct contact phone, 1-800-822-8965 ex.
726-8859.  Please call as soon as it is convenient for.  I look
forward to working with you.

 

Regards,

Richard Bernier
Online
Community Outreach Liaison

Dell
Inc.

800-822-8965
Ext. 726-8859 |
Richard_Bernier@dell.com

Dell
always strives to improve!  Please send feedback to my manager
Joanne_Hamann@dell.com

This
e-mail message may contain information that is confidential and/or privileged.
If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender by reply
e-mail and delete the message and any attachment(s). Thank you.

 

 

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RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

Richard,

 

Excellent shots. I’m not sure where you dug them up, but
they do give me a good bit of useful data. Now, if you can find a top shot
(with the lid open) and side views, that’ll give me a good idea of what
is possible. Yes, it does look fairly easy to Velcro, but the side views will give
me a better idea of which parts actually touch the table.

 

Scott

 

From: Richard_Bernier@Dell.com
[mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]
Sent: Wednesday, July 25, 2007 9:32 AM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Mr. Royal,

 

I am sending you a couple of photos of the M1330’s
underside.  There are a couple of vents for cooling, which you may be
concerned about.  I am not sure where the placement of the Velcro would go
but at least you can see and determine that for yourself with these photos.

 

I hope this helps you out.

 

Best regards

Richard Bernier
Online Community Outreach Liaison
Dell Inc.
800-822-8965 Ext. 726-8859 | Richard_Bernier@dell.com

Dell
always strives to improve!  Please send feedback to my manager
Joanne_Hamann@dell.com

This
e-mail message may contain information that is confidential and/or privileged.
If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender by reply
e-mail and delete the message and any attachment(s). Thank you.


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 24, 2007 8:11 PM
To: Bernier, Richard
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Ah yes, the 17xx series. Reasonable of you to point them out as
an option. Yet, do you recall my little quip that the 1710 reminded me of the
F-14? Well, that really applied to the whole 17xx series. They are fantastic
laptops, just as the Tomcat is still unequaled in the air, but both are bulky
and truly heavy. Yes, it’s incredible that my 1710 went a full
year without major failure.  That was a first in my 17 years of laptop
use. Yet, its weight and size make me feel it is an accident waiting to happen.
I broke two screens on its predecessor, the Gen2, just because they were nigh
impossible to avoid!
L Still, you may be right. At least a 1720 is a viable fallback
option.

 

Since I am a blogger, I’m considering asking for an
evaluation model of the 1330. It doesn’t have to be a high-end model,
either. What I would be evaluating is  whether or it would work in my
case. You see, I know from prior experience that 13” is about right for
my application. So I need to find out if there is enough flat space on the
underside for Velcro to work. The cooling vents are probably in that recessed
area, leaving the front and rear as likely Velcro points. You might be
surprised how relatively little Velcro it takes to secure even the 1710 without
blocking its cooling. I think the 1330 might still work in that respect. Of
course I’m not going to put Velcro on an evaluation unit. Just flipping
it over and checking its rump will answer that question. Naturally, I’d
use the opportunity to check out a few other questions.

 

True, finding a 1330 evaluator unit will likely take a while,
given their popularity, but I can wait. Remember, my Preferred Account gets
fatter each month.

 

From: Richard_Bernier@Dell.com
[mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 24, 2007 1:21 PM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Mr. Royal,

 

So, you went to the Dell sales site.  What about the Inspiron
1720 or 1721?  It’s a really great deal, got lots of power, and also
has a full keyboard.  Here is some more information for you that will
break down their differences.

 

Inspiron 1720
Processor:

– Intel Core™ 2 Duo

 

Video:

– Intel Graphics Media Accelerator X3100
– 128 MB NVIDIA® GeForce® 8400M GS
– 256 MB NVIDIA GeForce 8600M GT

 

Inspiron 1721

Processor:
AMD Turion™ 64 X2 Dual Core
AMD Athlon™ 64 X2

 

Video:

ATI Radeon X1270

 

Best regards,

Richard Bernier
Online Community Outreach Liaison
Dell Inc.
800-822-8965 Ext. 726-8859 | Richard_Bernier@dell.com

Dell
always strives to improve!  Please send feedback to my manager
Joanne_Hamann@dell.com

This
e-mail message may contain information that is confidential and/or privileged.
If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender by reply
e-mail and delete the message and any attachment(s). Thank you.


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Monday, July 23, 2007 9:23 PM
To: Bernier, Richard
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Oh boy. I checked the inks
you provided and the news isn’t good. The M1330 is sexy, but it might not
work for me. Look at its side profile and you see what could be a big problem.
The M1330 has a sleek forward tilt, but it achieved this feature by having a
stepped backside. This makes sense for most people, as the angle helps typing
and cooling. However, the fact that the bottom isn’t flat means that it
won’t Velcro worth a damn. Given that the M1330 with a battery is nearly
as heavy as the M1710, that’s not cool. I can imagine the thud of a 1330
hitting the carpet in the dead of night when the table is folded over. My old
Gen2 actually pulled that stunt once after a tech didn’t properly replace
the Velcro during a service call. Luckily, the Gen2/M1710 is fairly brick-like.

That just leaves the 1420, which isn’t even a XPS.
It’s a lowly Inspiron. In truth, Inspirons get a bum rap. I’ve had
several, and they’re decent  laptops when fully equipped.
Unfortunately, the 1420 only comes with Intel’s 925 integrated video
chipset. While good enough to run Aero Glass, that chipset hasn’t the
headroom needed to keep the 1420 viable for the required 2-3 years.


so it looks like I’m stuck in a wait state for a while longer. I sure
hope Dell comes out with something more muscular in the 14-15” slot. The
M1710 reminds me a lot of the just-retired F-14 Tomcat. It’s fast and
very capable, but a real hog in every sense of the word.

 

From:
Richard_Bernier@Dell.com [mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]
Sent: Monday, July 23, 2007 9:50 AM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Mr. Royall,

 

It is great to read that the motherboard was replaced without any
issues.

 

You had asked for technical information about the M1330 and the
M1420.  Currently, all I can offer is online documentation for the
M1330.  The M1420 manual is not available online as of yet.

 

http://support.dell.com/support/edocs/systems/xpsm1330/en/om/index.htm

 

 

The only other information would be from the sales webpage, which
looks like there are some really good deals.

 

http://www.dell.com/content/products/category.aspx/notebooks?c=us&cs=19&l=en&s=dhs

 

I regret that I do not have more in depth information. 

 

Best regards,

Richard Bernier
Online Community Outreach Liaison
Dell Inc.
800-822-8965 Ext. 726-8859 | Richard_Bernier@dell.com

Dell
always strives to improve!  Please send feedback to my manager
Joanne_Hamann@dell.com

This
e-mail message may contain information that is confidential and/or privileged.
If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender by reply
e-mail and delete the message and any attachment(s). Thank you.


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2007 10:33 PM
To: ‘Scott Royall’; Bernier, Richard; lrlind@lindelectronics.com
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Oh, I forgot to add that the M1710 had a successful brain
transplant yesterday per your dispatch. Good job.

 

From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Thursday, July 19, 2007 9:30 PM
To: ‘Richard_Bernier@Dell.com’; ‘lrlind@lindelectronics.com’
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Richard (and Lind
Electronics),

First, I had to tell you that it is sheer pleasure to deal with
someone who’s at least mildly technical. With Dell, customer service
usually reminds me of a deer caught in the headlights. Not very helpful. In
addition to being a software engineer for 25 years, I am an amateur radio
operator so I’m fairly comfortable with software and electronic hardware.

 

You’re right in saying it is difficult to definitively
predict whether a power supply (that’s the correct term, “power
adapter” is simply consumerese) designed for the  Gen2/M1710 can
properly power something like the M1420. The answer is a function of the
supply’s design. We’re talking about what are called “switching
supplies,” and they generate their output electricity in a manner quite
similar to how a Gatling gun works. Imagine a group of capacitors, which are
components that work like tiny batteries. You  charge up one and go to the
next, and the next, and so on. Meanwhile, the device you are powering is
discharging those capacitors in sequence. You don’t have to be a rocket
scientist to recognize what happens if you charge up all your capacitors faster
than they are being discharged. You get an automatic throttle effect just from
how a switching power supply works. Of course there are exceptions. Some of the
ubiquitous “wall warts” that surround us are so poorly designed and
made that they use 40% of their max load just keeping the capacitors topped off
even when powering nothing.

 

It’s also worth knowing a few basics about electricity. At
the voltages we’re talking about (the M1710 actually likes about 20V),
electricity is like string or wet spaghetti. You literally cannot push it into
a device, the device has to draw it. This is why the term “load” is
used. This is also why those 15-watt Compact Florescent bulbs have become all
the rage. The average house circuit can put up to 3000 watts to a light fixture
before opening the circuit breaker. Yet, those bulbs only draw 15 watts so
that’s the total load. Again, electricity isn’t like a liquid. You
can create it, but you can’t pump or push it. Electricity has to be
pulled. One final bit of evidence of this fact is the effect my M1710 has on my
wheelchair. Running at 100%, the M1710 can drain two Type 24 deep cycle
batteries in six hours. That number goes up to eight to ten hours under less
intense use. (And  now, you can better understand why the M1420 is under
consideration.)

 

So, unless the Lind engineers did something really weird in the
design of their DE2060-1429, it should be able to power something like the
M1420 without hardly doing more than idling. Am I right, Lind? The DE2060 is an
amazingly smart little brick that has served me without quibble for years. It
has been dropped, kicked, rolled over, dragged down the street, and so on.
Anything that well engineered isn’t likely to waste power.

 

Your comment about the M1330 is very helpful and on point. Yes,
the different power connector is a real factor that counts against the laptop.
Yet, this may become another question for the people at Lind. They don’t
seem to currently have a 12-VDC supply for the M1330, but only they know what
they are working on. Maybe the DE2060 could do it through a different cable. We
don’t know yet.

 

I was inaccurate in saying that I’m replacing the
M1710.  After all, it still has two years of warranty left. No, I’m
going to do what I used to do when I was with Shell. The 1710 will become my
“Ready Five” machine. Top Gun freaks will recognize the
phrase. In the Navy, it’s simply a second flight that’s always up
on deck with engines running ready to launch in five minutes if the first
flight needs it. That’s the future role for this laptop, to sit in a
corner, keeping itself synchronized with critical data on the new primary,
ready to replace it on the wheelchair very quickly in case of failure. Now you
can see why maintaining compatibility in the infrastructure required by the
laptops is important. The Lind brick is about the only thing on this chair that
is reliable enough to not need a backup.  And, when a laptop has to be
swapped, you really, really don’t want to have to swap infrastructure
boxes too. You want to be able to yank out a few connections—don’t
whine, we’re discussing emergency procedures, be able to pull off the
dead or dying machine (they’re simply velcro’d in place), and plunk
down the backup. It’s reasonable to call this the digital 
equivalent of “Eject! Eject! Eject!”, because it saves a lot of
people a lot of grief when I go down.

 

So, until we hear better, let’s just assume that the 1330
is still in the running. Can you think of any other Dells that should be
considered? Why don’t you send me a comparison of the 1420  and
1330. In addition to the usual stuff, I need to know weird things like number and
location of ports, etc.

 

Scott

                                                                                                                                                                    

From:
Richard_Bernier@Dell.com [mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]
Sent: Tuesday, July 17, 2007 2:31 PM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Mr. Royal,

 

I thank you replying back to me so soon.  Also, thanks for
removing my phone number from your blog.

 

Okay, I have created a dispatch for the motherboard to be
replaced.  If everything goes right with logistics, we should have someone
out to your home to replace the motherboard.  The dispatch number for your
order is 091966215.

 

Wow, you got a customer-built power supply that runs off your wheel
chair!  I haven’t heard about anything like that before, but it
sounds like a really great idea that a lot of people could use. 

 

I must admit it is really hard to say if this custom power supply
will properly power the 1430 or the 1330.  Follow with me for just a
moment to understand why I hesitate on providing you defiant answer.  The
following is little background about system types and power needs.

 

As you probably already know the Inspiron 9400/E1705 and the M1710
are very much the same, but the M1710 is much more powerful. The XPS 1710 come
with a 130 Watt D-series power supply.  The 9400/E1705 works on a 90 Watt
D-series power supply.  The reason for the M1710 needing more power is the
video card options.  The reason why I bring this up is that I know for
sure that the E1705 can use a 130 Watt power adapter if you where using a XPS
high end video card in it.

 

Okay, so where am I going with this you ask.  Let’s talk
about the Inspiron 1420.  It is shipped with either a 65 or 90 Watt power
supply, which uses a standard D-series adapter.  It depends on the video
option on which wattage to select.  The thing about this unit is that it
has good video options but they are onboard.  This system will not use
power unlike the M1710 or the 9400/E1705 which use separate video card
options.  So, could you use a 130 Watt power supply, probably?  But,
I personal would not do it.

 

Finally, let’s talk about the XPS M1330.  A beautiful
system which is already getting great reviews.  However, I do not think
this one is going to work for you, because that the power supply is completely
unique for the system.  Fist it is not a D-series power supply.  It
kind of looks like power supply to an Inspiron 2200, but the tip is Octagon
shaped, not smooth and round.  The second important item is this system
only has the 65 Watt power supply option.  A little side note to this, the
M1330’s power supply will not work in other Dells; however other 65 watt
D-series adapters will work in this system.

 

Yes, I know I probably gave you more information than you needed or
wanted.  But, this seemed like an important subject to you so I wanted to
make sure you had enough information to help.

 

My opinion:

 

I went to talk with a co-worker that knows a lot about this subject. 
Basically, when using a 130 Watt power supplies that the amount of power used
regardless the rating of the system.  So, you could attach the 130 W to
the M1330 (at your own risk says my co-worker), however the system is going to
be warmer than using a 65 W, as the extra energy will dissipate around the
system in the form of heat.  Personal I always try to match my power
supply with my systems rating.  I would rather place a lower power adapter
then a higher one.  It uses less energy, and your system stays nice and
cool.

 

I really hope that what I wrote you helps.

 

Best regards,

Richard Bernier
Online Community Outreach Liaison
Dell Inc.
800-822-8965 Ext. 726-8859 | Richard_Bernier@dell.com

Dell
always strives to improve!  Please send feedback to my manager
Joanne_Hamann@dell.com

This
e-mail message may contain information that is confidential and/or privileged.
If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender by reply
e-mail and delete the message and any attachment(s). Thank you.


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2007 7:36 PM
To: Bernier, Richard
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Regarding the number, done. Sorry.


The service tag for this puppy is FWDGKB1. My address is:

 

15906 Manfeld

Houston, TX 77082

 

It seems a crime to exchange
a very stable mainboard for a lousy USB port, but the point is valid.

 

Something you  can
really help with is selecting the next laptop. I need something just as
powerful as the M1710, but more compact  and energy-efficient (that means
the Core 2 Duo). Right now, the front runners seem to be the 1420 and 1330, but
there are questions that the Dell website won’t answer. First, will the
1710’s power adapter run either of these laptops? That question is a bit
tricky to get answered correctly. A salesperson will say no, simply because
smaller laptops come with smaller adapters to save cost and weight. However, as
of last year, at least the 1420 could run quite happy on a Gen2/1710 adaptor.
Will the 1330? Of course I don’t really use the AC adapters. Instead, I
have a very rugged automotive adapter custom-built by Lind Electronics for the
Gen2/1710. It runs off my wheelchair, and makes the laptop think it’s
always on AC.

 

From:
Richard_Bernier@Dell.com [mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]
Sent: Monday, July 16, 2007 9:31 AM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Mr. Royall,

 

Thank you for your response.  So, from what I gather from your
email, you currently do not have an issue that needs to be address.  However,
you said that there is a bad USB port.  I can setup a motherboard
replacement that will correct that.

 

Please reply back to me with your computers service tag, your
current address, and phone number.  When I can verify all your updated
information I will setup an order to get your computer repaired.

 

Also, one other item, I would request that you please xxx-xxx-xxxx
out my phone number, on your blog.  That number comes directly to my cube
and there is no way I could answer like a call center does.  Thanks in
advance.

 

I will be looking for your reply.

 

Best regards,

Richard Bernier
Online Community Outreach Liaison
Dell Inc.
800-822-8965 Ext. 726-8859 | Richard_Bernier@dell.com

Dell
always strives to improve!  Please send feedback to my manager
Joanne_Hamann@dell.com

This
e-mail message may contain information that is confidential and/or privileged.
If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender by reply
e-mail and delete the message and any attachment(s). Thank you.


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Saturday, July 14, 2007 3:26 PM
To: Bernier, Richard
Cc: Hamann, Joanne
Subject: RE: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support

 

Ok Richard, I’m a little disappointed that Dell took this
long to respond, but not really surprised. The email address, marie@dell.com, was a bit too cute to
 not be a public front. I was with a large company long enough to know how
often people get transferred. That’s why I’m sending a copy to
Joanne, to hopefully gain some degree of continuity across multiple agents.

 

I am somewhat a high-visibility Dell user. It is difficult to
sum myself up in a tidy little package that an agent will  relate to. I am
physically disabled, and am at least partially active in society. That means
that hardware going around with me is a bit hi-vis in itself. You can get a
photo of me at my website. The easiest place to see me is at www.conchbbs.com/blog.  I
recommend looking at it despite the fact that it’s a few laptop
generations back, because it shows just how visible the laptop I use is. By
extension, the photo gives you some clues just how dependent I am on my
laptops. They speak for me, they bank for me, they communicate for me, they
even game for me. If anything, that tells you I am probably more dependent on
my laptops than most Dell customers. It also means that the standard Dell
technical support experience, with calls going to Panama or Mumbai or wherever,
does not work for me. That’s why the online outreach program became
necessary in my case.

 

Now, after that lengthy intro, I have to tell you that I
don’t currently have a technical issue for you—yet. I appeared to
have one last week, but the source turned out to not be the 1710. The 1710 has
lost one USB port on the back, but there’s enough redundancy in a 1710 to
cover losing one USB port.

 

HOWEVER, my 1710 is supposed to be replaced as my primary laptop
later this summer. That says I’m going to have some highly-technical
questions needing good answers as I select the new laptop. Answers that
won’t be on the Dell website. That’s when you and Joanne will
really be in a position to help by  finding the answers

 

From:
Richard_Bernier@Dell.com [mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]
Sent: Friday, July 13, 2007 12:15 PM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: DELL: XPS 1710 technical support
Importance: High

 

Mr.
Royal,

 

My
name is Richard; I am part of Dell’s Online Community Outreach group here
in Round Rock, Texas.  You contacted us about your XPS 1710 needing
support.  Since I work a lot on these units, I will be the one to assist
you.

 

I
am going to provided you my direct contact phone, 1-800-822-8965 ex. 726-8859. 
Please call as soon as it is convenient for.  I look forward to working
with you.

 

Regards,

Richard Bernier
Online
Community Outreach Liaison

Dell
Inc.

800-822-8965
Ext. 726-8859 |
Richard_Bernier@dell.com

Dell
always strives to improve!  Please send feedback to my manager
Joanne_Hamann@dell.com

This
e-mail message may contain information that is confidential and/or privileged.
If you have received this e-mail in error, please notify the sender by reply
e-mail and delete the message and any attachment(s). Thank you.

 

 

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