Lind Electronics

Re: Urgent Request

There are few good companies left in the world, but here’s
one. Their caca ain’t caca!

 

From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Tuesday, September 29, 2009 16:11
To: ‘Terry Neville’
Subject: RE: Urgent Request

 

Terry,

 

Just wanted to let you know that power to my laptop has been
restored. The problem was indeed the output cable. As I said, I’ve never
had a Lind power supply actually fail, and I’ve used the 130-watt bricks
for five years.

 

On a different subject, have you received any reports of the
130-watt supply generating any radio interference? I’m an Amateur Radio
Operator, and my brick does tend to generate “hash” around 3 MHz.

 

Scott

 

From: Terry Neville
[mailto:lrlind@lindelectronics.com]
Sent: Friday, September 25, 2009 16:44
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Cc: Darrel Pinkston
Subject: Re: Urgent Request
Importance: High

 

Scott,

Out Darrel Pinkston has sent you today a replacement cable and I expect it to
arrive to you on Tuesday.

I also noted that you also placed an order for an adapter and an additional
cable. The adapter you placed order for is a 90 Watt timer adapter and not the
130 Watt adapter. I want to verify that this is what you want or if that is in
error. Also, did you want to order the additional cable knowing that one is now
en route to you. The order you placed will not ship today.

Please respond.

Thanks,  Terry

On 9/24/09 10:38 PM, "Scott Royall" <royall@conchbbs.com>
wrote:

Terry,
 
I urgently need a replacement output power cord (to a Dell laptop that’s
Series D-compatible) for my Lind Electronics 130-watt DC-to-DC brick. I think
it’s under warranty, but whatever. I’m disabled, and the brick
powers my laptop 24/7 so this is critical.
 
Scott Royall

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RE: Not Quite

That’s a reasonable question that Paul Thurrott can probably answer better
than I can. I do know Windows is aware of when it’s on a laptop. This is
tied to the Windows validation process, and Carbonite should be able to
access the related registry key. A laptop can only have so much attached
storage. I know the theoretical limit is quite high, but the practical limit
is much more realistic.

Also Leo, please remember that mere mortals like me don’t have your
outlandish pipes. My primary ISP is Comcast and my upload speed tops out at
300 KB/s so a little quick math reveals that Carbonite has nothing to worry
about from average people. I am talking about laptops in particular, which
further reduces the amount of data that can be uploaded in a reasonable
period. I know your laptops never leave your desk, but you’re weird. 🙂
Laptops are mobile, and the one I’m trying to back up is especially mobile.
That means it doesn’t sit around constantly connected to huge tubes. 🙂

I think you’ll agree that laptops are even more in need of backing up than
desktops. I don’t think it’s reasonable to restrict those owners to what
storage can be squeezed in under the keyboard. Let’s see what David has to
say.

Good night.

—–Original Message—–
From: Leo Laporte [mailto:leo@leoville.com]
Sent: Sunday, September 27, 2009 21:27
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: Re: Not Quite

Carbonite lets you backup everything in your computer – now matter how
much – but how can they backup external drives too? You could swap
that drive every day!

Leo


Leo Laporte
leo@leoville.com
<http://google.com/profiles/laporte&gt;

On Sep 27, 2009, at 6:47 PM, Scott Royall wrote:

> Leo,
>
> I understand what you’re saying, and I appreciate your response.
> However, we
> both know you generate roughly a terabyte of data weekly, and your
> Carbonite
> ads sometimes indicate that you use Carbonite to back up some of it at
> least. Hmm. That’s hardly personal files, but anyway. 🙂 My point
> was that
> those two external drives are an integral part of the computer
> system on my
> wheelchair. In fact, the Music folders on all my laptops point to
> the music
> drive, making it as personal as personal gets!
>
> In my view, USB and ESATA drives should be treated as part of the
> computer
> as far as Carbonite is concerned.
>
> Scott
>
> —–Original Message—–
> From: Leo Laporte [mailto:leo@leoville.com]
> Sent: Sunday, September 27, 2009 19:46
> To: royall@conchbbs.com
> Cc: david.friend@carbonite.com
> Subject: Re: Not Quite
>
> I do mention it from time to time. The issue Royall is that if you
> could backup every external drive and every network drive we could be
> talking about an unlimited amount of data. No one could offer that for
> $5/month. Carbonite is a personal service intended for backing up the
> contents of your computer – not every drive in your house. I’ll try to
> be more clear about that in the future.
>
> Leo
>
> —
> Leo Laporte
> leo@leoville.com
> <http://google.com/profiles/laporte&gt;
>
> On Sep 27, 2009, at 3:55 PM, Scott Royall wrote:
>
>> David,
>>
>> Carbonite is an interesting service/product, and Leo Laporte
>> certainly gives you plenty of mileage for your advertizing dollar
>> with his glowing endorsements. Unfortunately, neither Leo or your
>> sign-up page happen to mention that Carbonite only works on internal
>> drives. I just downloaded and installed it, and immediately
>> encountered this issue.
>> I am disabled and am in a powered wheelchair. There are several
>> computers in my life, but the most critical are laptops. Those are
>> so critical to me that one always is mounted on my chair, with the
>> others acting mainly as hot spares. The laptops are responsible for
>> speaking for me, in addition to ALL the other things people do with
>> laptops, finances, communication, entertainment, even (gasp!) games.
>> As far as I am concerned, the first rule of laptops is that they
>> NEVER have enough internal storage. This is why I also have two
>> external USB hard-drives mounted on the chair. My music collection
>> alone is over 100GB and resides on a hard-drive of its own. The very
>> drive that I needed Carbonite to back up!
>> Although I may be unique in some ways, the fact is that an
>> increasing number of people are acquiring very large collections of
>> pictures and music that necessitate dedicated hard-drives. Those
>> drives have to be external in the world of laptops, and that
>> extremely valuable data still must be protected. As an IT
>> professional, I may be able to enlist the ways of NTFS to "trick"
>> Carbonite but linking my Music folder as a sub-folder of another
>> folder on the internal drive, but I doubt it. There must be a better
>> way!
>
>

RE: Not Quite

Leo,

I understand what you’re saying, and I appreciate your response. However, we
both know you generate roughly a terabyte of data weekly, and your Carbonite
ads sometimes indicate that you use Carbonite to back up some of it at
least. Hmm. That’s hardly personal files, but anyway. 🙂 My point was that
those two external drives are an integral part of the computer system on my
wheelchair. In fact, the Music folders on all my laptops point to the music
drive, making it as personal as personal gets!

In my view, USB and ESATA drives should be treated as part of the computer
as far as Carbonite is concerned.

Scott

—–Original Message—–
From: Leo Laporte [mailto:leo@leoville.com]
Sent: Sunday, September 27, 2009 19:46
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Cc: david.friend@carbonite.com
Subject: Re: Not Quite

I do mention it from time to time. The issue Royall is that if you
could backup every external drive and every network drive we could be
talking about an unlimited amount of data. No one could offer that for
$5/month. Carbonite is a personal service intended for backing up the
contents of your computer – not every drive in your house. I’ll try to
be more clear about that in the future.

Leo


Leo Laporte
leo@leoville.com
<http://google.com/profiles/laporte&gt;

On Sep 27, 2009, at 3:55 PM, Scott Royall wrote:

> David,
>
> Carbonite is an interesting service/product, and Leo Laporte
> certainly gives you plenty of mileage for your advertizing dollar
> with his glowing endorsements. Unfortunately, neither Leo or your
> sign-up page happen to mention that Carbonite only works on internal
> drives. I just downloaded and installed it, and immediately
> encountered this issue.
> I am disabled and am in a powered wheelchair. There are several
> computers in my life, but the most critical are laptops. Those are
> so critical to me that one always is mounted on my chair, with the
> others acting mainly as hot spares. The laptops are responsible for
> speaking for me, in addition to ALL the other things people do with
> laptops, finances, communication, entertainment, even (gasp!) games.
> As far as I am concerned, the first rule of laptops is that they
> NEVER have enough internal storage. This is why I also have two
> external USB hard-drives mounted on the chair. My music collection
> alone is over 100GB and resides on a hard-drive of its own. The very
> drive that I needed Carbonite to back up!
> Although I may be unique in some ways, the fact is that an
> increasing number of people are acquiring very large collections of
> pictures and music that necessitate dedicated hard-drives. Those
> drives have to be external in the world of laptops, and that
> extremely valuable data still must be protected. As an IT
> professional, I may be able to enlist the ways of NTFS to "trick"
> Carbonite but linking my Music folder as a sub-folder of another
> folder on the internal drive, but I doubt it. There must be a better
> way!

Not Quite

David,

 

Carbonite is an interesting service/product, and Leo Laporte
certainly gives you plenty of mileage for your advertizing dollar with his
glowing endorsements. Unfortunately, neither Leo or your sign-up page happen to
mention that Carbonite only works on internal drives. I just downloaded and
installed it, and immediately encountered this issue.

I am disabled and am in a powered
wheelchair. There are several computers in my life, but the most critical are
laptops. Those are so critical to me that one always is mounted on my chair,
with the others acting mainly as hot spares. The laptops are responsible for
speaking for me, in addition to ALL the other things people do with laptops, finances,
communication, entertainment, even (gasp!) games. As far as I am concerned, the
first rule of laptops is that they NEVER have enough internal storage. This is
why I also have two external USB hard-drives mounted on the chair. My music
collection alone is over 100GB and resides on a hard-drive of its own. The very
drive  that I needed Carbonite to back up!

Although I may be unique in some ways,
the fact is that an increasing number of people are acquiring very large
collections of pictures and music that necessitate dedicated hard-drives. Those
drives have to be external in the world of laptops, and that extremely valuable
data still must be protected. As an IT professional, I may be able to enlist
the ways of NTFS to “trick” Carbonite but linking my Music folder
as a sub-folder of another folder on the internal drive, but I doubt it. There must
be a better way!

RE: FW: Dig this crap!

25a25sig

In fact, I have never bundled Xpress-It
with any hardware so it technically qualifies under the Medicare regulation. AAC
is all Xpress-It knows about. However, software requires hardware, and that’s
historically been the problem. Today, you can get a $300 netbook that will
happily run Xpress-It. The average user might need external speakers, but that’s
about it. Still, I simply don’t have the financial resources to put Xpress-It
on Medicare’s radar. That process takes a willing doctor, a subject, and
lawyers.

 

If you think other companies would
line up to buy Xpress-It, remember the dedicated machine environment that’s
in vogue. Also remember that they have products already to look after.

 

Xpress-It has been a good idea, but
it presumes the buyer really wants the user to be able to do more than talk. I agree
that’s a cynical description, but it’s also  darn accurate. The
situation won’t change until someone the buyers have to listen to tells
them that computers are all-around enablers. The more ways a person can use a
computer, the less disabled he or she is.

 

From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Wednesday, September 23, 2009 5:06 PM
To: Scott Royall
Subject: RE: FW: Dig this crap!

 

No doubt I didn’t express
myself clearly either.

 

In a dedicated environment,
there are other products out now that can objectively argue to be as good as
Xpress-It. I would counter that Xpress-It still maintains some minor
advantages, but I would have to concede the point that I’m an one-man
operation. That’s a real concern to large buyers. Even when we speak
about the non-Medicare market, the fact is still that buyers use similar criteria
of dedicated use to curb fraud. I’m not good enough as a programmer to
surpass the decade of R&D other companies have spent to catch up. At
present, I no longer have a clear advantage in a dedicated machine, because
Xpress-It was always meant and designed to offer dedicated-machine performance
on a general purpose system. It never was meant to beat that performance
independently.

 

This may seem to be defeatism,
but even the most tenacious fighter has to know the rules of the fight
he’s in. I have always wondered why the AAC market wasn’t crowded
with products like Xpress-It. It certainly isn’t magical, and mimicking
its strengths wouldn’t be difficult. Well, I finally have an answer to
why Xpress-It still stands alone. As the audio segment that started this
discussion points out, Medicare has no problem paying $8,000 for a dedicated
AAC device (probably a Dynavox), but will not buy a $2,000 general purpose
computer. This despite the fact that the “patients” (a word I have
come to loathe) in the two cases mentioned found even the rudimentary
text-to-speech software that comes with a GPC to be more helpful than the
$8,000 device! Is it any wonder why I get more conservative every second?

 

No, Medicare isn’t the
only payer (yet), but who really thinks private insurance uses purchasing
regulations that are more liberal than the government’s? Of course they
don’t, because their job requires them to minimize the risk of fraud. If
the government still only believes in dedicated devices, why should insurance
companies stick their necks out? The audio mentions that at least one AAC
company does sell a “dedicated device” through Medicare that end
users can then pay the same company $50 to convert it back into a general
purpose computer. I wonder how long it will be before Medicare declares that
practice to be fraudulent!

 

To me, this Medicare purchasing
regulation is only one brick in the Great Wall that largely separates the
Disabled from society. Other “bricks” in that wall extend as far as
our most basic instincts that govern who we associate with so I really cannot
foresee the Disabled (and yes, I am over-generalizing) becoming a valued
segment of society soon.

 

On the other matter, who do you
think I know at Dell with that much clout? I haven’t heard from Michael
Dell since about 1990! Besides, I haven’t done anything that recruiters
have found interesting in almost eight years. I regret to say my working days
are over.

 

From: DJSloan
[mailto:DJSloan25a26@SBCGlobal.net]
Sent: Tuesday, September 22, 2009 10:02 PM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: Re: FW: Dig this crap!

 

Scott ..

  It didn’t come through in the short time I had to write, and it’s
probably a lousy strategy to be expedient and not long-term focused however, if
the dollars are with a dumb product then you can make your product the smartest
of the dumb.  Somewhere in the future, you can make it behave like the
well mannered, machine sharing, smart thing that it is.  Or, market two
models: The dumb for purchase with Medicare dollars as an integrated machine hog
and the smart for sale to people who have their own machine.
  If Medicare won’t pay for it as it is and Medicare are the only dollars
you can see out there, then the task is to either 1) change Medicare, 2) have
Medicare buy only the software and whatever additional hardware (perhaps 
none) that it needs to function in a ‘real’ environment (for e.g. your
amplifier and speakers) that can’t be used for something else, and let the
patient use his own computer to run it, 3) find another market, or 4) be left
out of the market. 
  I don’t see No. 1 happening anytime soon as the potential for
"fraud!!" and "abuse!!" and other political hacks will
drown out whatever benefit the software brings if it runs on a computer that
Medicare buys that can also be used for (bad example, but Maaaarvin Zindler
guaranteed to play on the TV news) porno pictures.
  No. 2 opens your patient to having to buy a computer .. No easy task for
a person / family struggling to pay bills associated with medical care of the
patient needing it.
  No. 3 will take some imagination
  No. 4 is already happening.

  Let me switch subjects .. The news today has Dell buying Perot Systems,
who, if memory serves me correctly after working around them for four years,
make some 40% of their dollars in health care related consulting
services.  I don’t know if you can bend this onto your painter and pull,
but if you have a way to be referred out of Dell to Perot and a product to
bring with you, there might be some consulting opportunities.  Just a
thought – though it was triggered by how well you know your stuff about Dell
gear and your product.

djs

Scott Royall wrote:

The competitive advantage of
Xpress-It is exactly that it is a good team player in a GP world.

==========================================
DJSloan .. Houston, Texas
DJSloan25a26@Yahoo.com
Reference:

RE: FW: Dig this crap!

25a25sig

No doubt I didn’t express
myself clearly either.

 

In a dedicated environment,
there are other products out now that can objectively argue to be as good as
Xpress-It. I would counter that Xpress-It still maintains some minor
advantages, but I would have to concede the point that I’m an one-man
operation. That’s a real concern to large buyers. Even when we speak
about the non-Medicare market, the fact is still that buyers use similar
criteria of dedicated use to curb fraud. I’m not good enough as a programmer
to surpass the decade of R&D other companies have spent to catch up. At
present, I no longer have a clear advantage in a dedicated machine, because
Xpress-It was always meant and designed to offer dedicated-machine performance
on a general purpose system. It never was meant to beat that performance
independently.

 

This may seem to be defeatism, but
even the most tenacious fighter has to know the rules of the fight he’s
in. I have always wondered why the AAC market wasn’t crowded with
products like Xpress-It. It certainly isn’t magical, and mimicking its
strengths wouldn’t be difficult. Well, I finally have an answer to why Xpress-It
still stands alone. As the audio segment that started this discussion points
out, Medicare has no problem paying $8,000 for a dedicated AAC device (probably
a Dynavox), but will not buy a $2,000 general purpose computer. This despite
the fact that the “patients” (a word I have come to loathe) in the
two cases mentioned found even the rudimentary text-to-speech software that
comes with a GPC to be more helpful than the $8,000 device! Is it any wonder why
I get more conservative every second?

 

No, Medicare isn’t the
only payer (yet), but who really thinks private insurance uses purchasing regulations
that are more liberal than the government’s? Of course they don’t,
because their job requires them to minimize the risk of fraud. If the
government still only believes in dedicated devices, why should insurance
companies stick their necks out? The audio mentions that at least one AAC company
does sell a “dedicated device” through Medicare that end users can then
pay the same company $50 to convert it back into a general purpose computer. I
wonder how long it will be before Medicare declares that practice to be fraudulent!

 

To me, this Medicare purchasing
regulation is only one brick in the Great Wall that largely separates the
Disabled from society. Other “bricks” in that wall extend as far as
our most basic instincts that govern who we associate with so I really cannot
foresee the Disabled (and yes, I am over-generalizing) becoming a valued segment
of society soon.

 

On the other matter, who do you
think I know at Dell with that much clout? I haven’t heard from Michael
Dell since about 1990! Besides, I haven’t done anything that recruiters
have found interesting in almost eight years. I regret to say my working days are
over.

 

From: DJSloan
[mailto:DJSloan25a26@SBCGlobal.net]
Sent: Tuesday, September 22, 2009 10:02 PM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: Re: FW: Dig this crap!

 

Scott ..

  It didn’t come through in the short time I had to write, and it’s
probably a lousy strategy to be expedient and not long-term focused however, if
the dollars are with a dumb product then you can make your product the smartest
of the dumb.  Somewhere in the future, you can make it behave like the
well mannered, machine sharing, smart thing that it is.  Or, market two
models: The dumb for purchase with Medicare dollars as an integrated machine
hog and the smart for sale to people who have their own machine.
  If Medicare won’t pay for it as it is and Medicare are the only dollars
you can see out there, then the task is to either 1) change Medicare, 2) have
Medicare buy only the software and whatever additional hardware (perhaps 
none) that it needs to function in a ‘real’ environment (for e.g. your
amplifier and speakers) that can’t be used for something else, and let the
patient use his own computer to run it, 3) find another market, or 4) be left
out of the market. 
  I don’t see No. 1 happening anytime soon as the potential for
"fraud!!" and "abuse!!" and other political hacks will
drown out whatever benefit the software brings if it runs on a computer that
Medicare buys that can also be used for (bad example, but Maaaarvin Zindler
guaranteed to play on the TV news) porno pictures.
  No. 2 opens your patient to having to buy a computer .. No easy task for
a person / family struggling to pay bills associated with medical care of the
patient needing it.
  No. 3 will take some imagination
  No. 4 is already happening.

  Let me switch subjects .. The news today has Dell buying Perot Systems,
who, if memory serves me correctly after working around them for four years,
make some 40% of their dollars in health care related consulting
services.  I don’t know if you can bend this onto your painter and pull,
but if you have a way to be referred out of Dell to Perot and a product to
bring with you, there might be some consulting opportunities.  Just a
thought – though it was triggered by how well you know your stuff about Dell
gear and your product.

djs

Scott Royall wrote:

The competitive advantage of
Xpress-It is exactly that it is a good team player in a GP world.

==========================================
DJSloan .. Houston, Texas
DJSloan25a26@Yahoo.com
Reference:

RE: Dig this crap!

25a25sig

The case in question is exactly that,
a GPC had to be disabled to be accepted. Of course doing that would defeat the
purpose of Xpress-It, which is to function AS PART OF GPC USE. That’s its
main advantage over the competition.

 

From: DJSloan
[mailto:DJSloan25a26@SBCGlobal.net]
Sent: Tuesday, September 22, 2009 6:57 PM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: Re: Dig this crap!

 

Scott ..

  I’d ask for a better interpretation before I jumped to the conclusion
that a GPC can’t be used.  If it’s clear that it can’t, then maybe you
could test the theory by adapting the product to preclude use of the GPC for
anything else, i.e. loaded on a dedicated processor.
  Kind of destroys the house to keep the fireplace burning, but if that’s
the only reg in your way …

djs

Scott Royall wrote:

http://thisweekintech.com/213.
Listen to the story about 40 minutes in, and everything becomes clear. No
wonder why I couldn’t get any traction with Xpress-It. Medicare
regulation prohibits paying for a device that may be beneficial to the person
in a way outside of the disability. In other words, Medicare won’t pay
for anything on a general purpose computer!

 

  OH  MY  GOD!

 

==========================================
DJSloan .. Houston, Texas
DJSloan25a26@Yahoo.com
Reference: