Scott, I am Just Trying To Help

Bob,

In general, I enjoy a very lengthy and successful relationship with Helfman Dodge. The website that sent my contact information to you doesn’t permit the dealership to be specified, however. It also didn’t pass along the specific vehicle configuration I chose to you for an initial quote. Fortunately, I saved a copy of it and will include it here. Remember, a starting number is all I’m looking for at this stage.

Be aware that I am a disabled person, and this will be my first vehicle purchase involving public assistance. All of my prior purchases were with private funds so I’m feeling my way along on this one.

Scott

From: nccollado@energycorridor.machaikapps.net <nccollado@energycorridor.machaikapps.net>
Sent: Friday, June 15, 2018 14:22
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: Scott, I am Just Trying To Help

Scott,

Just trying to get a hold of you about our RAM Ram ProMaster Window Van. Most people only send us an email if they have a simple question… The Car is available! So it can only be one of the following:

1) Dealer Quote

2) Test Drive Appointment

3) Drive Out Price

4) Financing Pre-Approval

5) Down Payment Requirements

Let me know what you need…

You did not leave a phone # to give you a call. Let me know if I can help

Bob Houseman

Internet Sales Manager

Mac Haik Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram

713-659-9064 (Text)

http://email.energycorridor.machaikapps.net/o/eJwNzEEOgyAQAMDXlCPZBSFw4GA1TfoMWNZKqmDQi79v5wGTQ7ZGWVGCAnRg0aBXCpRE-ZxHNepp9rOzLzP5xwBcuX9uar2X3LrcI62xfONxnLLyJdagNVjmlCmjXVxeFmA_gLOEiY1JSvTQ2x237Z9Rq7SmdEpquxjpKq2-c0AcABA1_ABzAy5Q

proposed van.pdf

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Insurance Assistance

Marilyn,

This email is pure “fluff” in that it isn’t intended to get you to do anything except think on a personal level. John read your reply to my original email regarding you using some of our parents’ assets for my care to me, and one phrase stuck out because I’ve heard it all my life. The phrase went something like: “There are agencies to help the disabled…” Well, yes and no. They do exist in principle, but the real world has little tolerance for principles usually. Below is another email I recently wrote to a friend on this very subject, might as well reuse it. J

In this case, it is the letter of the will that determines the fate of those assets, and Dale’s wishes are written large on that document. I know John is somewhat impressed by the fact that Dale married a woman with “a rebel, a disabled kid, and a gay” for sons. Fair enough, that fact is true. On the other hand, I lived under Dale’s roof for twenty years so I have some sense of his personality and motivations. I also grew up in the prevailing culture of the time so I know which parts of the cable tv series, Mad Men, were believable. Dale was an eager young sales executive for a company that, among other things, was a defense subcontractor so an “instant family” such as ours had a certain appeal to someone in his place with his upbringing. Our eight years in Baton Rouge with him as president of a little company pretty much bore that out.

The relevance of that is only how it determines the current situation. Once married, Dale became preoccupied with preservation of what was his. That explains why the will is written as it is, to allow him to hold on his comforts. As John said at the end of our meeting, things will continue as they are until something drastically changes.

From: Scott Royall <royall@conchbbs.com>
Sent: Thursday, March 22, 2018 21:25
To: ‘Michael Wrenn’ <michael.wrenn@gmail.com>
Subject: RE: Insurance Assistance

Michael,

That is not a question easily answered because there are so many factors involved. On one hand, you don’t want to discourage the friend who is legitimately trying to help. Yet, you also have an obligation to make him understand that so much of the “crap ton of information out there” is completely inapplicable to the specifics of your situation, because you do not want him wasting effort on dead-end rabbit holes.

The crux of the matter is that public assistance programs like Medicare are set up to deal with the typical scenarios. A severally disabled person with high mental function who has a home and is determined to retain what social interactions he has left isn’t typical. We’re probably rare enough to be statistically insignificant so finding assistance that even acknowledges that such a scenario is possible is the first hurdle.

Then there is the question of what type of care is offered. So-called professional caregivers only help with the ADLs, eating, bathing, dressing, toileting, and transferring. That’s all Medicare covers, and I certainly need help with them. However, that’s merely existing, not living. Unless I’m prepared to just sit there not going anywhere, watching everything fall apart around me, and my dogs starve, I unfortunately need more assistance than the usual sources provide. This is why it has been so essential that I have managerial authority over my care. I’ve operated this way for thirty years, and I genuinely think it is the only way for someone in my position to have anything like a life.

Although there are other considerations, I’m going to save them. As I said, I have an idea that could more than offset the end of my long-term care insurance. It’s based on the earnings capacities of my parents’ assets. Apparently, they are several times the $55,000 in caregiver expenses I have annually. What I need to do is write a very detailed email to the financial planner and my brother, John, who is basically the trustee. They are largely unaware of the details of my situation, and I first need to confirm my understanding about the earning potential of the assets, and then get John to agree to my plan. That’s going to be a long email so I’m not planning on writing it until June. John has so much else on his mind that I think the email would sink into the noise if I wrote it sooner. As it is, my insurance will last until February. It’s fine with me if you want a copy of the email.

You need to recognize I don’t intend to live forever. I will be satisfied if I stick around long enough to let Leia live out her life. Beyond that doesn’t appeal to me, because I learned very early that group care is dehumanizing no matter how beneficent the intent. I volunteer Leia’s time for pet therapy at a local nursing home, and every session is a stark reminder of why I plan to end my life on my own terms. I definitely don’t plan to hang around long enough to become any more disabled than I already am. If you can accept that and still want to investigate other care options, I appreciate it. Options are good.

Scott

From: Michael Wrenn <michael.wrenn>
Sent: Thursday, March 22, 2018 6:52
To: Scott Royall <royall>
Subject: Insurance Assistance

Good Morning Scott,

I’ve done some cursory research on state and federal assistance. However, there is a crap ton of information out there. So I’d like to know if you are open to allowing me to help you out. If so, I need to know what insurance you currently have, and what avenues you’ve already investigated and the results of said investigations.

Don’t give up. Help is out there.

At your service,

Michael Wrenn – K5WRN
Sugar Land, Texas USA
michael.wrenn
www.kiltedcowboy.com

http://about.me/michaelwrenn

Personal News

I just met with my brother, John, and the outcome was predictably grim. It turned out he had misunderstood how our parents’ assets were able to erase the cost of a $70K hospitalization last year. The financial manager achieved that by liquidating non-principle resources rather than being able to rely on the income-generating ability of the principle resources. In fact, our parents are now drawing on the principle so rapidly that they will be broke in seven years at the present rate.

What this means for me is that any assistance will not come from my parents.

From: Scott Royall <royall@conchbbs.com>
Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2018 15:56
To: ‘John Royall’
Subject: RE: Personal News

Anytime after 11.

From: John Royall < >
Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2018 15:40
To: Scott Royall <royall>
Subject: Re: Personal News

What time are you up and about? I need to meet with you and bring some funds for belle. Took care of the bills at the vet.

Personal News

Methodist Sugarland is light-decades above West Houston Medical Cemetery.

From: kb5ziv <kb5ziv@rionet.coop>
Sent: Sunday, June 3, 2018 18:34
To: Scott Royall <royall@conchbbs.com>
Subject: Re: Personal News

I got to wonder why they didn’t catch the lungs full of stuff i.e. pneumonia but I wasn’t there damn I hate these newer doctors(quip for my mom)get well buddy need you on the radio,Jim

From: Scott Royall

Sent: Sunday, June 03, 2018 4:07 PM

To: ‘John Royall’

Cc: Marilyn Schmidt

Subject: RE: Personal News

More specifically, currently $5K/mo., plus sporadic household expenses necessary to maintain what’s essentially the caregivers’ working environment. So say $65K/yr. for just “run and maintenance” mode. For example, I’m told I presently have a dead animal in the wall behind the refrigerator.

I’m in Methodist Sugarland, they’re trying to eliminate apparent pneumonia before investigating the cardiac problem further. One rather blithe cardiologist did quip that he has my medications adjusted to stop my attacks. I’m dubious, but I can’t deny my stats are better.

From: Scott Royall <royall>
Sent: Friday, June 1, 2018 19:50
To: ‘John Royall’ <jroyall3>
Subject: RE: Personal News

$70k annually. Then again, I’m having chest pain again this evening so I’m placing no bets.

From: John Royall <jroyall3>
Sent: Friday, June 1, 2018 19:38
To: Scott Royall <royall>
Subject: Re: Personal News

I am very sorry to hear this Scott. I’m fairly certain neither of us will live long enough to collect any form of "inheritance " as mom is healthy as a horse. Her dementia has unfortunately increased dramatically very recently to the point that dr. Chhibber is inclined to declare her incompetent. If that occurs she will have to relocate to an assisted living memory facility which is basically a two person room for around $7k per month and dales runs $5.5k per month. Those are basically the rent and do not include their meds or other expenses. Your plan essentially circumvents IRS penalties as an inheritance. I need to know exactly what dollar amount you require monthly/quarterly so I can relate this to Marilyn for suggestions/solutions. Of course any arrangement would have to be run by dale for approval. FYI moms total investment worth is around $200k. Dale pays all the bills and is at this point maybe $600k? Let me know so that I may set up a meeting with Marilyn.

Personal News

Perfectly logical question. SSD is $24K/yr. That’s it.

another unhappy thought. My sole transportation is my 25yo van. The local wheelchair lift place refuses to service any equipment older than 7 years. This is not an immediate issue but will be by the end of the year if I’m still around, because the wheelchair lift has a hydraulic leak and loopy electronics. Medicare might help, but they lean toward minivans with simple ramps. Not solutions good with my full-size wheelchair.

More crap, but I guess it’s better if we see it coming.

From: John Royall <jroyall3@yahoo.com>
Sent: Sunday, June 3, 2018 17:04
To: Scott Royall <royall@conchbbs.com>
Subject: Re: Personal News

Realize your long term is expiring. Dale wants to know what other income you currently or will be getting such as SSD, Medicare or Medicaid and how much.

Personal News

More specifically, currently $5K/mo., plus sporadic household expenses necessary to maintain what’s essentially the caregivers’ working environment. So say $65K/yr. for just “run and maintenance” mode. For example, I’m told I presently have a dead animal in the wall behind the refrigerator.

I’m in Methodist Sugarland, they’re trying to eliminate apparent pneumonia before investigating the cardiac problem further. One rather blithe cardiologist did quip that he has my medications adjusted to stop my attacks. I’m dubious, but I can’t deny my stats are better.

From: Scott Royall <royall@conchbbs.com>
Sent: Friday, June 1, 2018 19:50
To: ‘John Royall’ <jroyall3@yahoo.com>
Subject: RE: Personal News

$70k annually. Then again, I’m having chest pain again this evening so I’m placing no bets.

From: John Royall <jroyall3>
Sent: Friday, June 1, 2018 19:38
To: Scott Royall <royall>
Subject: Re: Personal News

I am very sorry to hear this Scott. I’m fairly certain neither of us will live long enough to collect any form of "inheritance " as mom is healthy as a horse. Her dementia has unfortunately increased dramatically very recently to the point that dr. Chhibber is inclined to declare her incompetent. If that occurs she will have to relocate to an assisted living memory facility which is basically a two person room for around $7k per month and dales runs $5.5k per month. Those are basically the rent and do not include their meds or other expenses. Your plan essentially circumvents IRS penalties as an inheritance. I need to know exactly what dollar amount you require monthly/quarterly so I can relate this to Marilyn for suggestions/solutions. Of course any arrangement would have to be run by dale for approval. FYI moms total investment worth is around $200k. Dale pays all the bills and is at this point maybe $600k? Let me know so that I may set up a meeting with Marilyn.

Personal News

John,

I suppose I can’t delay this email any longer. I’m aware of how you already are being pulled in different directions by looking after our parents and raising your grandson, and the last thing I intend is to add any additional responsibilities to your workload. I have always understood I would eventually reach a point where I would be no longer able to arrange for and manage my care. I resolutely promised myself that, when that time came, I would accept responsibility for ending my life rather than slowly waste away in a nursing home or other institution. Having spent time in an example of the latter as a child and volunteered in instances of the former as an adult, I can’t imagine a fate more undignified or inhumane. I’ve seen no evidence that you can get people to genuinely care if money is your only inducement.

The irony is that I always thought my finances would be the breaking point. Indeed, I was going to run out of money for caregivers at the end of the year. However, I had a contingency plan in mind based on a recent revelation you made last year of how efficient my parents’ investments were. You mentioned to me that you were surprised that Dale’s investments were able to erase one of his $70K hospital stays. That number, $70K, is a magic number for me as it would’ve been more than enough to keep me going in a maintenance mode annually. I had intended to begin drafting a long email to you briefing you on my financial and tax situations, and requesting that you confirm the average quarterly return on our parents’ investments with Marilyn. You see, that’s a critical point because, as I see it, our parents’ assets exist for two main reasons. The first being to obviously provide for their care, and the other being to provide some sort of inheritance for you and your grandson’s future. It has been pretty impressive how you have restructured your own life to assure proper care for our parents, and I think it only right that there be something left for you and Pace.

I have ruled out any possibility of inheritance for me previously because of my Byzantine tax situation. I’ll spare you the inane and outright idiotic details, but the IRS is quite schizophrenic in how its tax laws and registrations apply to someone like me. On one hand, I can classify even most household expenses as shared caregiver costs as long as caregivers are staying with me. However, unlike nurses, caregivers are considered common domestic workers just like nannies by Congressional law (there’s another liberal rabbit-hole we could descend). That means I’ve always been responsible for the employer portion of their taxes, which wasn’t an issue until I was laid off. I’ve accrued massive tax debt since 2002, and the one bright spot is that the IRS now classifies me as "uncollectable." Of course that protection would immediately vanish if I ever got any inheritance and the IRS would probably take it all.

No, about the only way for our parents’ assets to possibly help me is by following the path taken by my expiring long-term care insurance. You see, reimbursements for medical expenses are not regarded as income by the IRS. This one convenient detail is what has kept me going for 20 years. Back when you wanted me to name someone to be trustee of our parents’ ill-fated trust for me, I actually did select a person. I simply never identified them because I could see that the trust was woefully underfunded at $40K. That wouldn’t have paid my caregivers for a year. My idea would actually work very similarly to the trust, but with adequate funding. That’s why I really want you to talk with Marilyn, because the idea is to support my routine expenses with a small portion of the annual dividends without affecting anybody else. I know from long experience that the IRS doesn’t even twitch as long as my expenses meet or exceed the reimbursements.

Yet, Nature has had other plans, bestowing a heart attack upon me a week ago. Although it was classified as “minor,” the latest echocardiogram puts my heart’s pumping capacity at under 25%, which isn’t enough to even offset the demand created by the spastic activity of my Cerebral Palsy. There are no real answers yet, but the prognosis doesn’t look promising. I will be hard-pressed to allow my dogs to live out their lives.