Oh No!

Wired News: Call It New Dell-hi

  All i can say is, "Oh god, no!"
 

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Call It New Dell-hi

 

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Wired News Report08:30 AM Jan, 30, 2006 EST

Dell said Monday it plans to add 5,000 jobs in India over the next two years, bringing its work force in the country to 15,000.

The computer maker is also looking to set up a manufacturing center in India, a move that could help boost the sale of Dell computers there. The company will hire 700 to 1,000 workers for a new call center in Gurgaon, a satellite town of the capital, New Delhi, said CEO Kevin Rollins. The new call center, the company’s fourth in India, will open in April, he said.

The other new hires will staff call centers in the cities of Bangalore and Hyderabad in southern India and Mohali in the northern state of Punjab. Also this year, the company plans to double the staff at its product testing center in Bangalore, which currently employs 300 engineers, Rollins said.

Rollins said previously that Dell would make India a hub for its software development and back-office work. The company currently employs about 10,000 people there.

Scores of Western companies have been cutting costs by shifting software development, engineering design and routine office functions to countries such as India, where English-speaking workers are plentiful and wages are low.

– – –

Sell phones: Sprint Nextel, the No. 3 U.S. mobile service, said on Monday it sued Florida company All Star Investigations to protect the privacy of Sprint’s wireless customers, alleging that the company’s websites fraudulently obtain and sell phone call records.

Sprint is also suing another Florida firm, 1st Source Information Specialists, with similar allegations.

Services offering to sell call records have come under increasing scrutiny in recent weeks with lawsuits from mobile providers and state authorities and a probe by telephone regulators.

Sprint said All Star is believed to own websites including detectivesusa.com, miamiprotection.com and privatedectivesusa.com. which it says obtain phone records for its wireless customers through misrepresentation and deceit.

A person answering the phone number listed on All Star’s website said the company carries out basic investigations such as criminal background checks and does not sell call records.

"We don’t do that service," said Anthony Gonzalez, who identified himself as company manager.

– – –

If you can’t beat ’em….: Warner Bros. said on Monday it would soon begin selling movies and television shows in Germany, Austria and Switzerland using a peer-to-peer network, embracing the very technology that has rattled the entertainment industry.

Starting in March, the new service called In2Movies will allow paying consumers to download a limited selection of Warner Bros. films and TV programs, including Batman Begins and The O.C., from central servers and from other users who have the desired files.

Warner Bros. said the German-language markets were only a first step and it soon plans to widen the use of P2P networks.

Films will be made available to registered users of the In2Movies service on the same day they are released on DVD in the German language. In addition to the studio’s blockbusters, In2Movies plans to sell local programming and material supplied by third parties.

 
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refresh all | expand all | collapse all Rants & Raves

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  s

RSS and Spam

In response to the following email, I’ve yet to find a RSS feed reader that really blows my skirt up. Certainly nothing that I’d inflict on my parents. However, spam is essentially history for me. If you use Outlook or Outlook Express, run—don’t walk—to www.cloudmark.com. It isn’t free, but it’s damn inexpensive and it works like the bomb. Between that and Outlook’s built-in junk-mail handler, silence is indeed golden and false positives quite rare.

 

As for RSS, my search for an idiot-proof reader continues.

 


From: DSloan [mailto:djsloan25a26@yahoo.com]
Sent: Monday, January 30, 2006 6:36 PM
To: Scott Royall
Subject: Re: Good News?

 

Scott ..

  I have a roll of b-logs I check about every other day.  If I don’t see an entry for a week or two, the site goes on the ‘occasional’ list, where I scan it about once per month.

  With your stuff, I prefer the immediacy of e-mail (I check off-site e-mail twice per day on weekdays).

  I know all about RSS feeds, but can’t use them on the work e-mail address and suffer such unholy SPAM on one of my outside addresses that I’d likely lose some if not all RSS mails to the filter. 

  So there – keep me on an e-mail list.

djsloan

Scott Royall <royall@conchbbs.com> wrote:

Occasionally, there is happy news. Robert Scoble sent email in the dead of night to alert me that he had indeed subscribed to my blog. Now, at least now we have a reader who might be able to affect a difference. Robert also alerted me to what I’ll call a formatting issue in the process I use to post my blog entries. This entry will allow me to see if I’ve fixed it.

 

Using a blog to raise awareness about the challenges an active disabled person goes up against almost daily is definitely a mixed blessing. In one way, it makes getting the word out easier, but the reality is that people who know what blogs are are themselves relative “edge cases.”  That’s why I also use a mailing list.

 

Tell me what you think.

 

 

 

==========================================
DJSloan .. Houston, Texas
djsloan25a26@yahoo.com
Reference:

Good News?

Occasionally, there is happy news. Robert Scoble sent email in the dead of night to alert me that he had indeed subscribed to my blog. Now, at least now we have a reader who might be able to affect a difference. Robert also alerted me to what I’ll call a formatting issue in the process I use to post my blog entries. This entry will allow me to see if I’ve fixed it.

 

Using a blog to raise awareness about the challenges an active disabled person goes up against almost daily is definitely a mixed blessing. In one way, it makes getting the word out easier, but the reality is that people who know what blogs are are themselves relative “edge cases.”  That’s why I also use a mailing list.

 

Tell me what you think.

 

 

RE: Hiring the Disabled

Funny that you should mention Microsoft. They were among my first contacts when Shell started its IT reductions four years back. Of course, that contact was just with their HR department so naturally it was stillborn. A former Shell Oil HR director admitted to me and my mother that a recruiter’s role is to whittle down a huge pile of applicants, not find reason to add to it. Perhaps it’s time for a different tact entirely. Indeed, I began to follow the blogs of certain “edge cases” in the industry at about the same time as I started mine. One of them is Robert Scoble’s Scobleizer. Scoble’s title at Microsoft is “Technology Evangelist,” meaning that his job is—among other things—to look out for things that could make Bill Gates even richer. J In other words, he’s paid to think unconventionally. The downside is that he already tracks 850 other blogs. We have to hope something I say piques his interest enough to at least justify making me #851. 😀 (And yes Robert, Google does at least recognize my name.)

No, health insurance turns out to be a non-issue for a potential employer exactly because my disability is pre-existing. The insurer simply disallows expenses directly related to it. That does mean they won’t buy wheelchairs, braces, and stuff for me, but I never asked them to. Since Cerebral Palsy is stable in at least my case, any other medical costs are still fair game.

No, the news media has never shown any interest in my case, despite the fact that I appeared on TechTV. A friend tried to pitch the story to the locals and got nowhere with the editors.

What I find most distressing is that I am sitting here with a potential goldmine, but the potential users don’t even know they need it. I am a decent C++ developer, but I’m certainly am no match for a young “wiz kid.” I frankly might not be good enough for Microsoft, but I did manage to create what I consider to be a “killer app” for anyone with a speech disability and intact mental faculties. If you know anything about the history of Xpress-It, you are aware of the reasons why I had to develop it. I had to have a way to effectively communicate verbally with co-workers, customers, etc while with Shell, and none of the then available products in the Augmented and Assistive Communications market had the flexibility and clarity my employer demanded. It’s now eight years later, and that’s incredibly still true. You have to spend twice as much to even approach Xpress-It’s blend of features.

I have previously blogged extensively about the factors that has made the AAC market so difficult to penetrate. Yes, it is a medical-related market, with most purchases based on recommendations from medical professionals with at best only fair computer knowledge. Much more to the point is that disabled users themselves are not demanding quality far greater than what has been out there 15 years! Jesus Marie! Yet, when you really drill down to the root problem, there is a tremendous sense of fatalism among disabled people. It’s as if they don’t feel they deserve the tools necessary to enter, or re-enter, society. That’s pure self-defeatism to me. True, I had the advantage of being a software developer. I already knew how powerful computers were before I ever selected ETI to be the synthesizer engine for Xpress-It. Yet, knowing something is possible is just the first baby step. You must then summon the courage to make whatever you need happen; otherwise, you might as well pack up your tent because nobody else will make your needs their first priority.


From: malinda julien [mailto:ustk9@ustk9.com]
Sent: Friday, January 27, 2006 6:27 PM
To: ‘Scott Royall’
Subject: RE: Hiring the Disabled

 

Scott, have you ever thought of contacting Microsoft?  Do you think you could work for them? Maybe you need to think “bigger”.  You could relocate if the $$ was good enough… right?

I think that a prospective employer would be concerned about the insurance for you since you have pre-existing conditions, have they ever said anything about that?  What about going to the press/ tv media? You are bright and rather funny, if nothing else but determined… I would think that some computer based company needs you to be dedicated.  Heck, you never stay out late and come into work with a hang over! LOL!  (although you should!)

Go bigger, find a company who is willing to see you for what you are and not how they see it.  I know we are both rather “spirited” individuals, but I always respect you.  I doubt, even with my Irish heritage and tenacious nature, I could manage the struggles you must face.

Dogs are our Archangels, that is why I named our kennel that.  Lilly was sent here to watch over you, and I think she does a pretty good job.  They love us no matter what. 

mj

 


From: Scott Royall [mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Friday, January 27, 2006 3:08 PM
To: ustk9@ustk9.com
Cc: Eanderson@carlsoncomp.com; ‘Kevin Smith’; ‘Myra Gass’; Blaise; Blog; bradgsmith@mdanderson.org; Brandon Milligan; Carol McKinney; Dianne; DSloan; Jack Davidson; janis.nicol@nau.edu; John Royall; Ming Zu; Mom; Richard Becton; Sakina Lanig; Tao Ju
Subject: RE: Hiring the Disabled

 

You are basically right. Yet, I’m not done quite yet. A recruiter once told me I only had a 10% chance of getting a job, but my entire life has been a string of beaten odds. One after another. The only way to defeat prejudice is by shining the bright light of publicity on it. That makes people step back and review their approach. In that sense, this is no different from any other minority hiring situation. The more that bright light shines, the more uncomfortable prejudice is.

Then too, I’m still trying to market Xpress-It. I’m planning a few changes this year which might spark sales at a much lower net income.

You didn’t see my December blog entry where I listed the things I am still thankful for. On top of the list was a good, sweet dog that hates to let me out of her sight.  As I write this, we are half-way through a very long day for her of outings to do various things. Lilly is in the doorway of my bathroom napping. But, those eyes will pop open as soon as I touch the joystick of my wheelchair. That’s something at least.

 


From: malinda julien [mailto:ustk9@ustk9.com]
Sent: Friday, January 27, 2006 10:28 AM
To: ‘Scott Royall’
Subject: RE: Hiring the Disabled

 

Scott, sounds like a no win situation.  People don’t change, they don’t want to. It is easier to walk away than it is to defend your right to be there.  I know for you it must seem impossible to be “trapped” so to speak in this disability BS, when you are well suited for the job.  If their clients feel uncomfortable with you, then they should be a little more educational when they come in.

No matter what, business is business and even though you are talented in this area and capable of doing the job, they are going to discriminate.  But, like you say “prove it”. Can’t prove “intent”.

I wish I could give you the adage of “something will come up”, but that may not be true, and certainly isn’t helpful. I can’t imagine how this could change.  Is it imperative that you remain in Houston? I would imagine so since your care system is there.  If you have to go to a living assisted residence, what will become of you?

 

RE: Hiring the Disabled

You are basically right. Yet, I’m not done quite yet. A recruiter once told me I only had a 10% chance of getting a job, but my entire life has been a string of beaten odds. One after another. The only way to defeat prejudice is by shining the bright light of publicity on it. That makes people step back and review their approach. In that sense, this is no different from any other minority hiring situation. The more that bright light shines, the more uncomfortable prejudice is.

Then too, I’m still trying to market Xpress-It. I’m planning a few changes this year which might spark sales at a much lower net income.

You didn’t see my December blog entry where I listed the things I am still thankful for. On top of the list was a good, sweet dog that hates to let me out of her sight.  As I write this, we are half-way through a very long day for her of outings to do various things. Lilly is in the doorway of my bathroom napping. But, those eyes will pop open as soon as I touch the joystick of my wheelchair. That’s something at least.

 


From: malinda julien [mailto:ustk9@ustk9.com]
Sent: Friday, January 27, 2006 10:28 AM
To: ‘Scott Royall’
Subject: RE: Hiring the Disabled

 

Scott, sounds like a no win situation.  People don’t change, they don’t want to. It is easier to walk away than it is to defend your right to be there.  I know for you it must seem impossible to be “trapped” so to speak in this disability BS, when you are well suited for the job.  If their clients feel uncomfortable with you, then they should be a little more educational when they come in.

No matter what, business is business and even though you are talented in this area and capable of doing the job, they are going to discriminate.  But, like you say “prove it”. Can’t prove “intent”.

I wish I could give you the adage of “something will come up”, but that may not be true, and certainly isn’t helpful. I can’t imagine how this could change.  Is it imperative that you remain in Houston? I would imagine so since your care system is there.  If you have to go to a living assisted residence, what will become of you?

 

RE: Hiring the Disabled

 Oh boy, whether you know it or not, you’re asking the $80,000 question, and the answer will make a lot of people uneasy. I am a Windows applications programmer both by training and 14 years’ experience. That could actually mean a lot of different things, but, in my case, it means I can make a Windows box do just about anything practical. (Games are a separate category.) At this point in my life, I should be in the $80,000 bracket and preparing to retire. Even the Shell lay-off was a mere speed-bump for other developers. At most, they relocated. Obviously, I’m not so lucky. Guess how many interviews I’ve had in the four years since I was laid off. That’s right, zero. In fact, there’s an interesting little pattern there. Several recruiters have contacted me all eager to interview. That is, until I had to reveal my level of disability. Then, they either disappear or say I’m not right for the position after all.

Illegal? Yeah, but prove it. You can’t unless you read minds. You can infer what’s going on from the pattern, but that’s not evidence. I even had trouble getting assignments while at Shell. One of my former managers said he wasn’t comfortable exposing me to customers because of my attitude and disability. It is true that the oil patch is pretty conservative, but people behave as their management permits. In any event, these recruiters serve a wide variety of clients well beyond energy. Still they almost hurt themselves backing away as soon as my disability comes up.

 


From: malinda julien
Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2006 7:42 PM
To: ‘Scott Royall’
Subject: RE: Hiring the Disabled

 

Scott, what type of job are you trying to get? What really is the problem? Your physical traits? Certainly not your emotional or intellectual status.  So the laws don’t help, I see… not that anything put into law actually makes anyone any difference.

I hope you don’t have to go into a care facility – that would be awful.  Anything I can do to help?

 

Malinda Julien