HOT Roddy

Richard,

 

Here’s a little something to pass along to the laptop
engineering gnomes.

 

I flashed the latest Dell-recommended revision, A08, to the
BIOS of my XPS M1530, Hot Roddy, yesterday. Now the graphics unit, a Nvidia
8600M, is idling at about 150 F., up to 20 F. above the other components. I somehow
suspect that’s not what the guys had in mind! J I’m seeing GPU spikes up to 175 F. CPU peaks at 155,
which is unremarkable in Roddy since she’s a hot-blooded little critter.

 

Also, why was the hard-drive temperature sensor disabled n
A08?

 

Scott

Advertisements

IronKey

This is for your CEO, David Jevans.

 

I think I love you—or at least IronKey. The funny thing
is, I nearly missed finding out about it. I heard your interview on Steve Gibson’s
weekly Security Now podcast. As you likely know, Steve had been quite coy in his
advance promotion of the interview, merely describing IronKey as a encrypted
thumb-drive. He was almost too coy for your own good because I debated skipping
the episode, having no interest in thumb-drives. As it was, I listened last
night while doing other things, and I was half-way through your interview before
your discussion of IronKey’s less obvious features popped up my antennae.
It seems that your product may solve a problem I’ve grappled with since
Windows Vista came out.

 

I’m what the medical community dispassionately calls a
“severely disabled” person, being in a power wheelchair and unable
to speak. Yet, I managed to earn a Computer Science degree, and worked for 14
years for Shell Oil as an application developer before outsourcing mania laid
me off in 2002. It became apparent during my career that talking was a
necessity, and none of the commercially available products satisfied my
employers so I wrote my own solution, Xpress-It. Since 2002, I have been struggling
to make a living marketing it.

 

I will include the full description of Xpress-It at the end of
this email, but I recognize that you’re a busy man and the salient point
for IronKey is that it may solve the dual problems of product distribution and copy
protection. To be clear, I detest copy protection. It serves to mainly create
usability nightmares, especially for the Disabled. IronKey seems to address
most of the problems, though. The thumb-drive is nigh indestructible, with a “virtual
CD” feature that’s ideal for distributing Xpress-It, and the API
will allow the licensing data to reside securely in the IronKey’s
protected memory. Simple, efficient, cool.

 

Of course, you will turn me over to your sales people, and that’s
fine. I wanted to let you know of another small niche that IronKey may fill. I have
an assistive technology conference looming in late June, and it’s been
strongly suggested that I give away one or two copies of Xpress-It there. That assumes
I can integrate IronKey by then. If I ever make any sales, the cost of your
keys will simply be included in the retail price. For now though, one or two
should be plenty for development and testing. Even your $79 model has far greater
capacity than Xpress-It will ever use, but I don’t yet know what your SDK
costs (shudder).

 

NOTE: This initial email will appear on my blog (free
publicity), but obviously subsequent communications will be confidential for
security reasons.

 

Here’s the poop on Xpress-It:

 

Xpress-It uses the Eloquence speech engine developed by Eloquent Technology
Inc. for the Department of Defense. This all-software synthesizer produces very
high quality speech that even total strangers understand. Xpress-It is a
text-to-speech system with the following features:

·        
Practically unlimited vocabulary (max. database
size: 2GB)

·        
Automatic entry of new words into vocabulary

·        
Programmable pronunciations

·        
Word prediction based on the user’s previous
history

·        
Customizable voices

·        
Built-in voice control language

·        
Complete compatibility with Windows 98 or higher

·        
Modest system performance impact 

·        
No additional hardware needed, just sound
support and speakers

 

 

 

                                                                

RE: Texas AT confrence at Region 4- title?

Good point.

 

On the other
paw, my Dell “girls” will be rather prominent.

 

From:
Richard_Bernier@Dell.com [mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]
Sent: Friday, March 14, 2008 12:24 PM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: RE: Texas AT confrence at Region 4- title?

 

You
never mentioned that you created
Xpress-It.

Richard Bernier
Online Community Outreach Liaison
Dell Inc.
800-822-8965 Ext. 726-8859 | Richard_Bernier@dell.com
Doing good or needing improvement, either way you can contact my
manager
Jennifer_Lea_Hughes@dell.com


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 13, 2008 3:50 PM
To: ‘Angela Standridge’
Subject: RE: Texas
AT confrence at Region 4- title?

 

Angela, thanks
for the editing help. That’s a real challenge shoehorning everything into
50-100 words.

 

Yes, the issue
of thinking beyond communication is something I intend to spend some time on.
It probably won’t do any good, but I can try. I’m also considering
doing a little stunt to extend what “communication” means. What do
you think the reaction would be if a little radio I had with me suddenly came
alive during the presentation and called me? The entire contact wouldn’t
last much longer than a minute, just long enough for the person calling me to
give their location across town. Of course the whole thing would be pre-arranged
and carefully timed, making use of my amateur radio license. However, the whole
thing would appear spontaneous to the audience, and hopefully drive home the
idea that AAC must be extremely flexible to emulate the task switching the
average person has to be able to do without thinking.

 

Please give me
an afternoon time slot. Between where I live and the daily schedule my
caregivers are used to, I probably won’t even get there before 10.
We’ll exchange email on what the presentation desktop might be able to help.
I suspect the fact that it runs Windows 2000 is going to limit what it can do.

 

From: Angela Standridge
[mailto:amstand@esc4.net]
Sent: Thursday, March 13, 2008 8:53 AM
To: Scott Royall
Subject: RE: Texas
AT confrence at Region 4- title?

 

You crack me up- “borg like design”.  Resistance
is futile. Your points about having the laptop for more than communication is
very valid too. I think our folks do not have that perspective. The descriptors
are usually 50-100 words to fit in the program.  I will edit down what you
sent.  This should be fine. I am sending out the room assignments
(hopefully tomorrow and will include what I came up with for you to review.

 

Angela Standridge, M.A., CCC-SLP, ATP

Region 4 ESC

713-744-6831


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2008 7:41 PM
To: Angela Standridge
Subject: RE: Texas
AT confrence at Region 4- title?

 

In effect,
you’re saying my descriptor should be a synopsis of my presentation.
(“Well duh, Scott.”) Ok, but how long is a descriptor, a page? Hmm,
let’s see:

 

I am Scott Royall, born in Bryan, Texas
in 1956. Except for eight wonderful years in Baton Rouge,
Louisiana, I’ve lived in Houston all my life. I worked for Shell Oil
for 14 years as a software developer before being laid off in April, 2002.
Those interested can view my resume at
http://www.conchbbs.com/Docs/Final_Presentation_Resume.rtf.

I’m physically
disabled with Cerebral Palsy. I use a customized electric wheelchair to get
around, but am unable to talk. That’s what prompted me to develop Xpress-It.
With Xpress-It, a standard laptop computer, an automotive-type audio amplifier
and speakers (all powered by my wheelchair), I can talk to anyone.

One of life’s first lessons I
had to learn was that verbal communication is one of the tools that makes the
difference between just existing and actually being a member of society. Harsh
but true. How eloquent we are often plays a big role in deciding our future. I quickly
found the current crop of augmentative communication software to be lacking in
flexibility, reliability, speech quality, vocabulary, or inter-operability with
other programs. Fortunately, being a professional software developer put me in
a position to do something about those problems. Indeed, my former Shell
supervisors gave me a mandate because they were dissatisfied with the leading
AAC options at the time. A major point is that, no matter how well an AAC
solution may work, it will become a hindrance to anyone who is trying to
function in society if it isn’t completely compatible with other computer
technology.

For the record:

Xpress-It uses the
Eloquence speech engine developed by Eloquent Technology Inc. for the
Department of Defense. This all-software synthesizer produces very high quality
speech that even total strangers understand. Xpress-It is a text-to-speech
system with the following features:

  • Practically
    unlimited vocabulary (max. database size: 2GB)

  • Automatic
    entry of new words into vocabulary

  • Programmable
    pronunciations

  • Word
    prediction based on the user’s previous history

  • Customizable
    voices

  • Built-in
    voice control language

  • Complete
    compatibility with Windows 98 or higher

  • Modest system
    performance impact 

  • No additional
    hardware needed, just sound support and speakers

 

Angela, the
“day in the life” idea is interesting, but my daily life is pretty
dull. The salient point is the extreme importance of the compatibility issue. I
could not use most AAC software because of its Borg-like design. Taking over a
entire computer to perform a single task, no matter how important, is really
frown upon in office environments. One of the bigger goals of my talk is
getting the audience to think beyond AAC. If someone does have to drag a laptop
around to talk for him, it should do 10,000 other things for him too. There are
good reasons why I name my laptops after my dogs; the one I most trust
naturally is named after my working dog.

 

In case it
wasn’t obvious, the stuff in black is a preliminary descriptor. Copy it
to your heart’s delight. I realize you’re very busy, but I still
welcome your feedback.

 

From: Angela Standridge
[mailto:amstand@esc4.net]
Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2008 3:03 PM
To: Scott Royall
Subject: RE: Texas
AT confrence at Region 4- title?

 

We have had augmented communicators present several times in the
past so the audience is not as novice as you would think. They usually love
these sessions. The presenters have usually composed their “speech”
ahead of time as you plan to do and then answered questions at the end with the
word/spelling based systems they use. I think the idea of giving them a
“day in the life” perspective would work very well. You might even
share your blog (we could bring it up on the presentation computer).

 

I would have the following in the descriptor:

 

Who you are and the fact that you are an augmented communicator

What you do- adult, living independently. AAC company, blog, etc.

Successes and struggles you have faced/ do face

What you envision kids in public school would need to be as
successful (literacy, access to curriculum)

Details about your software (if you would like to give away a copy
of your software in the session rather than the general drawing, that is fine)

 

Angela Standridge, M.A., CCC-SLP, ATP

Region 4 ESC

713-744-6831


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2008 7:47 PM
To: Angela Standridge
Subject: RE: Texas
AT confrence at Region 4- title?

 

Yes, I realized
you needed more. I entered what came to mind at the spur of the moment, and I
apologize for its brevity.
J

 

Actually, I
welcome your thoughts and input. I recognize that I will essentially be walking
the proverbial tightrope with my presentation, because I will be addressing an
audience consisting largely of rehabilitation-related professionals. I need to
establish a degree of rapport with them that gets us through some misgivings I
have with the process of selecting and procuring AAC. What I don’t want
to do is a 30-minute “info-mercial” for Xpress-It. Rather, I
 want to talk about what it really takes for a “severely
disabled” person to be a functioning member of the community. Only at the
very end do I want these professionals thinking: “damn, we just
experienced what someone with a really good AAC can do.” My talk is going
to be more about trying to get people to raise their expectations.

 

I will be
“cheating” in some sense, because I will probably record my audio
as a MP3. The point of that is just to simplify my workload during the
presentation. Xpress-It could certainly give the talk in real-time, but
it’s better at interactive conversation. Turning the talk into a MP3
allows very simple pausing to answer questions. It also allows me to take my
hand off the keyboard and thus move around the front of the room as other
speakers do. I haven’t yet decided what my visuals will be. I truly
don’t want to be wired to anything, but my laptops certainly have the
horsepower to drive an overhead projector so we’ll see. It’s true
that another one of those unspoken messages I want to leave the audience with
is that Xpress-It is about the only AAC that peacefully co-exists with
everything on modern laptops.

 

I like your
“walking the walk, talking the talk” line. You managed to nail my
topic exactly so that should be the title. Given what I’ve said here,
I’d welcome any snippets you might have for the descriptor. I’m
stuck for something catchy.

 

I will probably
blog some of this because that’s what I do, but only things you’re
comfortable with sharing.

From: Angela Standridge
[mailto:amstand@esc4.net]
Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2008 1:26 PM
To: ROYALL@CONCHBBS.COM
Subject: Texas
AT confrence at Region 4- title?

 

Scor

 

Scott-
I need a title for your presentation.  This is the descriptor you
submitted:

Experience
what is possible for someone who depends on AAC.

 

I
would also suggest you beef up the descriptor a bit.  I would mention that
the presentation will be done using the AAC tool.  Sort of “walking
the walk and talking the talk”- literally 😉

 

Angela Standridge, M.A., CCC-SLP, ATP

Education Specialist Special Education

Region 4 Education Service Center

7145
West Tidwell

Houston,
TX 77092-2096

Phone:
713-744-6831

Fax:
713-744-6311

Email: amstand@esc4.net
www.theansweris4.net

 

NOTICE: This
electronic transmission, including any attachments, is intended only for the use
of the individual or entity to which it is addressed.  This transmission
may contain information that is confidential, privileged and exempt from
disclosure under applicable law.  If you are not the intended recipient,
you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or use of
any of the information contained in this transmission is strictly
PROHIBITED.  If you have received this communication in error, please
notify the sender immediately by replying to this message and delete this e-mail
message from your computer.

 

RE: Texas AT confrence at Region 4- title?

Angela, thanks
for the editing help. That’s a real challenge shoehorning everything into
50-100 words.

 

Yes, the issue
of thinking beyond communication is something I intend to spend some time on.
It probably won’t do any good, but I can try. I’m also considering
doing a little stunt to extend what “communication” means. What do
you think the reaction would be if a little radio I had with me suddenly came
alive during the presentation and called me? The entire contact wouldn’t
last much longer than a minute, just long enough for the person calling me to
give their location across town. Of course the whole thing would be
pre-arranged and carefully timed, making use of my amateur radio license.
However, the whole thing would appear spontaneous to the audience, and
hopefully drive home the idea that AAC must be extremely flexible to emulate
the task switching the average person has to be able to do without thinking.

 

Please give me
an afternoon time slot. Between where I live and the daily schedule my
caregivers are used to, I probably won’t even get there before 10.
We’ll exchange email on what the presentation desktop might be able to
help. I suspect the fact that it runs Windows 2000 is going to limit what it
can do.

 

From: Angela Standridge
[mailto:amstand@esc4.net]
Sent: Thursday, March 13, 2008 8:53 AM
To: Scott Royall
Subject: RE: Texas AT confrence at Region 4- title?

 

You crack me up- “borg like design”.  Resistance
is futile. Your points about having the laptop for more than communication is
very valid too. I think our folks do not have that perspective. The descriptors
are usually 50-100 words to fit in the program.  I will edit down what you
sent.  This should be fine. I am sending out the room assignments (hopefully
tomorrow and will include what I came up with for you to review.

 

Angela Standridge, M.A., CCC-SLP, ATP

Region 4 ESC

713-744-6831


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2008 7:41 PM
To: Angela Standridge
Subject: RE: Texas
AT confrence at Region 4- title?

 

In effect,
you’re saying my descriptor should be a synopsis of my presentation.
(“Well duh, Scott.”) Ok, but how long is a descriptor, a page? Hmm,
let’s see:

 

I am Scott Royall, born in Bryan, Texas
in 1956. Except for eight wonderful years in Baton Rouge,
Louisiana, I’ve lived in Houston all my life. I worked for Shell Oil
for 14 years as a software developer before being laid off in April, 2002.
Those interested can view my resume at
http://www.conchbbs.com/Docs/Final_Presentation_Resume.rtf.

I’m physically
disabled with Cerebral Palsy. I use a customized electric wheelchair to get
around, but am unable to talk. That’s what prompted me to develop Xpress-It.
With Xpress-It, a standard laptop computer, an automotive-type audio amplifier
and speakers (all powered by my wheelchair), I can talk to anyone.

One of life’s first lessons I
had to learn was that verbal communication is one of the tools that makes the
difference between just existing and actually being a member of society. Harsh
but true. How eloquent we are often plays a big role in deciding our future. I
quickly found the current crop of augmentative communication software to be
lacking in flexibility, reliability, speech quality, vocabulary, or
inter-operability with other programs. Fortunately, being a professional
software developer put me in a position to do something about those problems.
Indeed, my former Shell supervisors gave me a mandate because they were
dissatisfied with the leading AAC options at the time. A major point is that,
no matter how well an AAC solution may work, it will become a hindrance to
anyone who is trying to function in society if it isn’t completely
compatible with other computer technology.

For the record:

Xpress-It uses the
Eloquence speech engine developed by Eloquent Technology Inc. for the
Department of Defense. This all-software synthesizer produces very high quality
speech that even total strangers understand. Xpress-It is a text-to-speech
system with the following features:

  • Practically
    unlimited vocabulary (max. database size: 2GB)

  • Automatic
    entry of new words into vocabulary

  • Programmable
    pronunciations

  • Word
    prediction based on the user’s previous history

  • Customizable
    voices

  • Built-in
    voice control language

  • Complete compatibility
    with Windows 98 or higher

  • Modest system
    performance impact 

  • No additional
    hardware needed, just sound support and speakers

 

Angela, the
“day in the life” idea is interesting, but my daily life is pretty
dull. The salient point is the extreme importance of the compatibility issue. I
could not use most AAC software because of its Borg-like design. Taking over a
entire computer to perform a single task, no matter how important, is really
frown upon in office environments. One of the bigger goals of my talk is
getting the audience to think beyond AAC. If someone does have to drag a laptop
around to talk for him, it should do 10,000 other things for him too. There are
good reasons why I name my laptops after my dogs; the one I most trust
naturally is named after my working dog.

 

In case it
wasn’t obvious, the stuff in black is a preliminary descriptor. Copy it
to your heart’s delight. I realize you’re very busy, but I still
welcome your feedback.

 

From: Angela Standridge
[mailto:amstand@esc4.net]
Sent: Wednesday, March 12, 2008 3:03 PM
To: Scott Royall
Subject: RE: Texas
AT confrence at Region 4- title?

 

We have had augmented communicators present several times in the
past so the audience is not as novice as you would think. They usually love
these sessions. The presenters have usually composed their “speech”
ahead of time as you plan to do and then answered questions at the end with the
word/spelling based systems they use. I think the idea of giving them a
“day in the life” perspective would work very well. You might even
share your blog (we could bring it up on the presentation computer).

 

I would have the following in the descriptor:

 

Who you are and the fact that you are an augmented communicator

What you do- adult, living independently. AAC company, blog, etc.

Successes and struggles you have faced/ do face

What you envision kids in public school would need to be as
successful (literacy, access to curriculum)

Details about your software (if you would like to give away a copy
of your software in the session rather than the general drawing, that is fine)

 

Angela Standridge, M.A., CCC-SLP, ATP

Region 4 ESC

713-744-6831


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2008 7:47 PM
To: Angela Standridge
Subject: RE: Texas
AT confrence at Region 4- title?

 

Yes, I realized
you needed more. I entered what came to mind at the spur of the moment, and I
apologize for its brevity.
J

 

Actually, I
welcome your thoughts and input. I recognize that I will essentially be walking
the proverbial tightrope with my presentation, because I will be addressing an
audience consisting largely of rehabilitation-related professionals. I need to
establish a degree of rapport with them that gets us through some misgivings I
have with the process of selecting and procuring AAC. What I don’t want
to do is a 30-minute “info-mercial” for Xpress-It. Rather, I
 want to talk about what it really takes for a “severely
disabled” person to be a functioning member of the community. Only at the
very end do I want these professionals thinking: “damn, we just
experienced what someone with a really good AAC can do.” My talk is going
to be more about trying to get people to raise their expectations.

 

I will be
“cheating” in some sense, because I will probably record my audio
as a MP3. The point of that is just to simplify my workload during the
presentation. Xpress-It could certainly give the talk in real-time, but
it’s better at interactive conversation. Turning the talk into a MP3
allows very simple pausing to answer questions. It also allows me to take my
hand off the keyboard and thus move around the front of the room as other
speakers do. I haven’t yet decided what my visuals will be. I truly
don’t want to be wired to anything, but my laptops certainly have the
horsepower to drive an overhead projector so we’ll see. It’s true
that another one of those unspoken messages I want to leave the audience with
is that Xpress-It is about the only AAC that peacefully co-exists with
everything on modern laptops.

 

I like your
“walking the walk, talking the talk” line. You managed to nail my
topic exactly so that should be the title. Given what I’ve said here,
I’d welcome any snippets you might have for the descriptor. I’m
stuck for something catchy.

 

I will probably
blog some of this because that’s what I do, but only things you’re
comfortable with sharing.

From: Angela Standridge
[mailto:amstand@esc4.net]
Sent: Tuesday, March 11, 2008 1:26 PM
To: ROYALL@CONCHBBS.COM
Subject: Texas
AT confrence at Region 4- title?

 

Scor

 

Scott-
I need a title for your presentation.  This is the descriptor you
submitted:

Experience
what is possible for someone who depends on AAC.

 

I
would also suggest you beef up the descriptor a bit.  I would mention that
the presentation will be done using the AAC tool.  Sort of “walking
the walk and talking the talk”- literally 😉

 

Angela Standridge, M.A., CCC-SLP, ATP

Education Specialist Special Education

Region 4 Education Service Center

7145
West Tidwell

Houston,
TX 77092-2096

Phone:
713-744-6831

Fax:
713-744-6311

Email: amstand@esc4.net
www.theansweris4.net

 

NOTICE: This
electronic transmission, including any attachments, is intended only for the
use of the individual or entity to which it is addressed.  This
transmission may contain information that is confidential, privileged and
exempt from disclosure under applicable law.  If you are not the intended
recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution
or use of any of the information contained in this transmission is strictly
PROHIBITED.  If you have received this communication in error, please
notify the sender immediately by replying to this message and delete this
e-mail message from your computer.

 

FW: BBC E-mail: Fuelling Baghdad’s energy crisis

Déjà
vu all over again. We are  five  years down the road with no real plan. Yet, I
shudder to think that people like Obama truly seem to believe that a mass troop
exodus won’t be dumping pure hydrogen on the fire.

 

 

> —–Original Message—–

> From: webmasters@bbc.co.uk
[mailto:webmasters@bbc.co.uk] On Behalf Of me

> Sent: Saturday, March 08, 2008 7:06 PM

> To: royall@conchbbs.com

> Subject: BBC E-mail: Fuelling Baghdad’s energy
crisis

>

>

> ** Fuelling Baghdad’s energy crisis **

> As Baghdad experiences ongoing power shortages, Hugh
Sykes hears claims this is a legacy

> of US planning for post-Saddam Iraq.

> < http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/em/fr/-

> /2/hi/programmes/from_our_own_correspondent/7283534.stm
>

>

>

> ** BBC Daily E-mail **

> Choose the news and sport headlines you want – when
you want them, all

> in one daily e-mail

> < http://www.bbc.co.uk/email >

>

>

> ** Disclaimer **

> The BBC is not responsible for the content of this
e-mail, and anything written in this e-

> mail does not necessarily reflect the BBC’s views or
opinions. Please note that neither the

> e-mail address nor name of the sender have been
verified.

>

> If you do not wish to receive such e-mails in the
future or want to know more about the

> BBC’s Email a Friend service, please read our
frequently asked questions.

> http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/help/4162471.stm

>

>

>

> —

> No virus found in this incoming message.

> Checked by AVG.

> Version: 7.5.518 / Virus Database: 269.21.7/1319 –
Release Date: 3/8/2008 10:14 AM

 

RE: You Dirty Rats!

Huh-uh.

 

From:
Richard_Bernier@Dell.com [mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]
Sent: Friday, March 07, 2008 11:03 AM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: RE: You Dirty Rats!

 

Okay, point taken….

Richard Bernier
Online Community Outreach Liaison
Dell Inc.
800-822-8965 Ext. 726-8859 | Richard_Bernier@dell.com
Doing good or needing improvement, either way you can contact my
manager
Jennifer_Lea_Hughes@dell.com


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 06, 2008 6:21 PM
To: Bernier, Richard
Subject: RE: You Dirty Rats!

 

Silly boy.

 

You know darn well Humanity has
a love-hate relationship going with its computers. We’re dependent on them, but
they are incredibly frustrating at times. Roddy, for instance, is truly
emulating the uneven nature of her four-legged namesake. Both seem to try to
please, but both screw up almost daily. The “flat” Roddy is frequently
blue-screening without apparent cause. The blue screens are usually so generic
that not even Microsoft’s automated troubleshooting system can offer a clue.
Grr. Sooner or later, a clue will turn up.

 

From:
Richard_Bernier@Dell.com [mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 06, 2008 3:37 PM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: RE: You Dirty Rats!

 

 

“emptying a few M4 mags into a
Dell laptop does have a certain therapeutic value to it”

 

Therapeutic?  You got an
axe to grind with the
XFR D630 or what (I know you’re just kidding around).

 

Regards,

Richard Bernier
Online Community Outreach Liaison
Dell Inc.
800-822-8965 Ext. 726-8859 | Richard_Bernier@dell.com
Doing good or needing improvement, either way you can contact my
manager
Jennifer_Lea_Hughes@dell.com


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 06, 2008 2:12 PM
To: Bernier, Richard
Subject: RE: You Dirty Rats!

 

So noted.

 

But nah, it takes more than a
tough-looking case to earn what’s called a MILSPEC rating. The testing for the
higher ratings is long, and sometimes downright “not nice.” Hmm, the thought of
emptying a few M4 mags into a Dell laptop does have a certain therapeutic value
to it.
J

 

From: Richard_Bernier@Dell.com
[mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 06, 2008 1:32 PM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: RE: You Dirty Rats!

 

Mr. Royall,

 

The Latitude XFR D630 is designed for comical and government
applications.  But, I personal think it will be mostly use by the military
in the field since it is a tough and robust system.

 

 

Best regards

Richard Bernier
Online Community Outreach Liaison
Dell Inc.
800-822-8965 Ext. 726-8859 | Richard_Bernier@dell.com
Doing good or needing improvement, either way you can contact my
manager
Jennifer_Lea_Hughes@dell.com


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2008 7:45 PM
To: Bernier, Richard
Subject: RE: You Dirty Rats!

 

That’s a nice thought, but Dell
doesn’t seem to do that. Then again, this first model seems to be strictly a
business laptop, seeming a little light on performance.

 

From: Lourez Bullock

Sent: Tuesday, March 04,
2008 7:23 PM
To: ‘Scott Royall’
Subject: RE: You Dirty Rats!

 

Maybe they’d like you to test it out……….I can’t think of many more
rugged scenarios than you provide.

 

 


From: Scott Royall [mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2008 6:42 PM
To: Richard_Bernier@Dell.com
Subject: You Dirty Rats!

 

Yo Richard,

 

What’s this I hear about Dell entering the ruggedized laptop
market? Fine timing, Lucille (as in, “you picked a fine time to leave me,
Lucille)! Someday, I do wish Dell would show me what’s up their coat sleeve before
I buy my next laptop. J I’m not
adverse to reasonable NDAs

 

And yeah, you may consider this an opening to do an
informational “nano-plug” via my blog.

 

Scott

RE: You Dirty Rats!

Silly boy.

 

You know darn well Humanity has
a love-hate relationship going with its computers. We’re dependent on
them, but they are incredibly frustrating at times. Roddy, for instance, is
truly emulating the uneven nature of her four-legged namesake. Both seem to try
to please, but both screw up almost daily. The “flat” Roddy is
frequently blue-screening without apparent cause. The blue screens are usually
so generic that not even Microsoft’s automated troubleshooting system can
offer a clue. Grr. Sooner or later, a clue will turn up.

 

From:
Richard_Bernier@Dell.com [mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 06, 2008 3:37 PM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: RE: You Dirty Rats!

 

 

“emptying a few M4 mags
into a Dell laptop does have a certain therapeutic value to it”

 

Therapeutic?  You got an
axe to grind with the
XFR D630 or what (I know you’re just kidding around).

 

Regards,

Richard Bernier
Online Community Outreach Liaison
Dell Inc.
800-822-8965 Ext. 726-8859 | Richard_Bernier@dell.com
Doing good or needing improvement, either way you can contact my
manager
Jennifer_Lea_Hughes@dell.com


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 06, 2008 2:12 PM
To: Bernier, Richard
Subject: RE: You Dirty Rats!

 

So noted.

 

But nah, it takes more than a
tough-looking case to earn what’s called a MILSPEC rating. The testing
for the higher ratings is long, and sometimes downright “not nice.”
Hmm, the thought of emptying a few M4 mags into a Dell laptop does have a
certain therapeutic value to it.
J

 

From:
Richard_Bernier@Dell.com [mailto:Richard_Bernier@Dell.com]
Sent: Thursday, March 06, 2008 1:32 PM
To: royall@conchbbs.com
Subject: RE: You Dirty Rats!

 

Mr. Royall,

 

The Latitude XFR D630 is designed for comical and government
applications.  But, I personal think it will be mostly use by the military
in the field since it is a tough and robust system.

 

 

Best regards

Richard Bernier
Online Community Outreach Liaison
Dell Inc.
800-822-8965 Ext. 726-8859 | Richard_Bernier@dell.com
Doing good or needing improvement, either way you can contact my
manager
Jennifer_Lea_Hughes@dell.com


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2008 7:45 PM
To: Bernier, Richard
Subject: RE: You Dirty Rats!

 

That’s a nice thought, but
Dell doesn’t seem to do that. Then again, this first model seems to be
strictly a business laptop, seeming a little light on performance.

 

From: Lourez Bullock

Sent: Tuesday, March 04,
2008 7:23 PM
To: ‘Scott Royall’
Subject: RE: You Dirty Rats!

 

Maybe they’d like you to test it out……….I
can’t think of many more rugged scenarios than you provide.

 

 


From: Scott Royall
[mailto:royall@conchbbs.com]
Sent: Tuesday, March 04, 2008 6:42 PM
To: Richard_Bernier@Dell.com
Subject: You Dirty Rats!

 

Yo Richard,

 

What’s this I hear about Dell entering the ruggedized
laptop market? Fine timing, Lucille (as in, “you picked a fine time to
leave me, Lucille)! Someday, I do wish Dell would show me what’s up their
coat sleeve before I buy my next laptop. J
I’m not adverse to reasonable NDAs

 

And yeah, you may consider this an opening to do an
informational “nano-plug” via my blog.

 

Scott